sherry


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sherry

[from Jérez], naturally dry fortified wine, pale amber to brown in tint. The term sherry originally referred to wines made from grapes grown in the region of Jérez de la Frontera, Andalusia, Spain; today it may refer to any of the fortified wines from S Spain and is also applied to similar wines produced in the United States, Latin America, and South Africa. After fermentation the wine is fortified with brandy. Matured in cask for several years, the wine when mature is classed as palma, very dry; raya, full and rich; or palo cortado, an intermediate variation. The big sherry houses blend the wines with reserves from the Soleras, collections of flavoring wines from very fine vintages, kept in dated casks and maintained for long periods by exact replenishment of the blending wine withdrawn from the oldest cask with wine from the next oldest. The varieties of sherry include amontillado and manzanilla, apéritif wines of the palma type; the fairly sweet, fruity oloroso and amoroso, blended from palo cortado; and the very sweet golden or brown sherries, raya blends. The dessert sherries are usually colored and sweetened by the addition of dark, syrupy wines. Sherry contains from 15% to 23% alcohol, the more highly fortified wines being for export. Sherry must be long matured in wood and bottle to acquire the mellowness demanded of brandied wines. It is a widely used flavoring in fine cookery.

Sherry

 

a strong wine made from different varieties of grapes. The alcoholic content is about 20 percent by volume; the sugar content is about 3 percent. Sherry is prepared by allowing dry fortified wine to mature under a film formed on the surface by a special sherry yeast. In five or six months about one-third of the wine is removed from under the film and replaced by new wine. The wine that was removed is mixed with table and dessert wines and then allowed to mature longer, from two months to two years. The best known Spanish sherries are fino, amontillado, and oloroso.

Sherries are produced in the USSR in Armenia, Moldavia, the Crimea, Uzbekistan, and Turkmenia. In addition to strong sherry, a dry table wine of the sherry type, containing 14 percent alcohol by volume, is produced.

sherry

[′sher·ē]
(food engineering)
A dry to sweet fortified wine with nutty flavor and ranging from pale to dark amber in color.

sherry

dry fortified wine, originally made from grapes grown in Andalusia, Spain. [Span. Hist.: NCE, 2501]
See: Wine

sherry

a fortified wine, originally from the Jerez region in S Spain, usually drunk as an apéritif
References in classic literature ?
Well--here is Blanche's health" (he took some of the wine himself), "in the weakest sherry I ever drank in my life." As he set down his glass, Mr.
Never can I say that my case is desperate while you can swallow your chicken-broth and sip your Amontillado sherry. The moment I want money, I will write to Mr.
Franklin his sherry; I retired to my own room; and I solaced myself with the most composing pipe of tobacco I ever remember to have smoked in my life.
"Sherry, sir--certainly," said their host, turning to his hostel.
Concluding his story in these words, the doctor helped himself to another glass of the "sherry wine." I was not satisfied yet; I wanted to know more.
Maud and her bosom friend, "Gwace," were seated on tin cake-boxes; Sherry and Spider adorned the refrigerator; while Tom and Rumple foraged for the party.
This was a bold figure of speech, but not exactly the right thing; for, unhappily, the pat opening had slipped away--even couplets from Pope may be but "fallings from us, vanishings," when fear clutches us, and a glass of sherry is hurrying like smoke among our ideas.
In the pint decanter of sherry, not a drop remained.
When he breakfasted or dined all the resources of the club--its kitchens and pantries, its buttery and dairy--aided to crowd his table with their most succulent stores; he was served by the gravest waiters, in dress coats, and shoes with swan-skin soles, who proffered the viands in special porcelain, and on the finest linen; club decanters, of a lost mould, contained his sherry, his port, and his cinnamon-spiced claret; while his beverages were refreshingly cooled with ice, brought at great cost from the American lakes.
They remembered, likewise, the good feasts of London the profusion of ale and sherry with which the citizens of London paid their friends the soldiers; -- they looked with terror at the black war bread, at the troubled waters of the Tweed, -- too salt for the glass, not enough so for the pot; and they said to themselves, "Are not the roast meats kept warm for Monk in London?" From that time nothing was heard of but desertion in Lambert's army.
Let's rinse our mouths with a drop of burnt sherry; the last-comer shall stand it, Mivins shall fetch it, and I'll help to drink it.
Cutter boasted that he never drank anything stronger than sherry, and he said he got his start in life by saving the money that other young men spent for cigars.