Shingle

(redirected from shingler)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Idioms, Wikipedia.

shingle

1. coarse gravel, esp the pebbles found on beaches
2. a place or area strewn with shingle
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Shingle

 

rock fragments 1-10 cm in diameter that have been rounded to varying degrees. The sharp-pointed fragments are rounded by the running water of rivers or by lake and seacoast waves. Sea shingle usually has a flatter shape than river shingle. Shingle is categorized as small (1-2.5 cm), medium (2.5-5 cm), and large (5-10 cm). Shingle is used chiefly in road construction.


Shingle

 

a wooden roofing material in the form of a small plate having a wedge-like cross section. The sharp edge of the shingle fits into a groove in the thick edge of the neighboring shingle when the roof is covered. Shingles are made by hand (by splitting radially) and by machine (by sawing) from a straight layer of white spruce (the best shingles), pine, or aspen. Shingles are 50–60 cm long and 9–11 cm wide. They will last, depending on the climate and on the type and treatment of the wood used, for 25–35 years. Shingles are used in rural construction.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

shingle

[′shiŋ·gəl]
(geology)
Pebbles, cobble, and other beach material, coarser than ordinary gravel but roughly the same size and occurring typically on the higher parts of a beach.
(materials)
A rectangular piece of wood, metal, or other material that is used like a tile and arranged in overlapping rows for covering roofs and walls.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

shingle

A roofing unit of wood, asphaltic material, slate, tile, concrete, asbestos cement, or other material cut to stock lengths, widths, and thickness; used as an exterior covering on sloping roofs and side walls; applied in an overlapping fashion; usually in one of the following designs: chisel pattern, coursed pattern, diamond pattern, fishscale pattern, sawtooth pattern. Also see wood shingle and pine shingle.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Managing director, Jeremy Shingler, said: "We were delighted with the amount of interest we received to come and have an up-close look at our industry and we are really hopeful that this will encourage some of them to join us here at Shingler Group.
Shingler's rise to prominence was one of the stories of the year after he had spent so long in the wilderness.
Weeks went by and when an opportunity to get regular rugby elsewhere came knocking, Shingler headed for France to link up with Division Two side Stade Montois until the end of the season.
Clubman A: Over 40s: Trevor Shingler (Beta) 30, Simon Slater (Gas Gas) 38, Richard Beever (Montesa) 81.
Another try by Lawrence, converted by Shingler, put Blues A into a 14-3 lead after 26 minutes but their opponents pegged them back when Aubrey dashed over for a corner touchdown which Thomas converted with a splendid kick from the touchline.
"We value our customers' time," says Tricia Shingler. "Our policy is to respond as quickly as possible to requests for estimates and cleanings.
Shingler put the Blues ahead for the first time when he nailed a penalty at the end of the third quarter to make it 15-14 in their favour but they fell foul of the accurate boot of Joe Ford.
The Scarlets had already confirmed that 30-year-old Shingler would miss the start of next season.
Shingler was able to walk off the pitch, but initial tests found he was unable to take his place on the plane to Washington, ahead of Saturday's clash with the Springboks.
Russell and Shingler were caught up in a personal duel with the Warriors ace kicking two penalties and converting tries from Henry Pyrgos and Lee Jones and the Blues star sinking four penalties and converting a try from Tom James before his crucial miss.
Telegraph n cartoonist Nick Shingler shares tips with budding artists