shipping time


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shipping time

[′ship·iŋ ‚tīm]
(engineering)
The time elapsing between the shipment of material by the supplying activity and receipt of material by the requiring activity.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Regarding the current IATA goal of shaving two days off the average sixday shipping time for air cargo, Scholte says this would be an admirable achievement, and one that can benefit everyone in the supply chain.
This agreement will better enable Reedy to serve its customers by reducing shipping time and costs.
"Waterborne resins that are produced and supplied from Europe to Asia Pacific require longer shipping time with higher risks of delays and winter shipping requirements to our customers in Asia Pacific.
The new vessel is expected to further enhance the operation of Muntajat and guarantee faster shipping time to better serve global customers.
Mr Al Sharif said that would shave almost a week off shipping time and eliminate any issues that might arise previously.
With facilities strategically located in Willoughby, OH, Orlando and Pensacola, FL, the new facility enables Kennedy to increase production and shorten shipping time for customers, resulting in enhanced customer service and satisfaction.
By exporting directly from Alaska to Asia the shipping time is reduced by some 10 days, reducing transport costs.
It also had experienced problems with shipping time that averaged 30 days to some external markets, making it difficult to adjust production and inventory if a shipment was lost or delayed.
"Shipping and clearance times cause problems as you need to add two weeks' clearance time onto the shipping time. It's getting tougher and tougher here.
The pipeline is being constructed to bypass the Strait of Hormuz, thereby cutting the shipping time by two days and reducing the impact of a possible blockade by Iran.
Gary Dawson, managing director of AV Dawson, said: "There has been a sustained push towards moving freight by containers for some time now because of the benefits it brings in terms of lower shipping costs and cuts to shipping time.
Other upsides: There's no waste from cutting, shipping time is minimal, and best of all, knockoffs can be produced in hours, rather than days or weeks.