shipworm


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shipworm

or

teredo

(tĕrē`dō), marine bivalvebivalve,
aquatic mollusk of the class Pelecypoda ("hatchet-foot") or Bivalvia, with a laterally compressed body and a shell consisting of two valves, or movable pieces, hinged by an elastic ligament.
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 mollusk of the family Teredinidae, specialized for boring in wood. A shipworm is not a worm, but a greatly elongated clamclam,
common name for certain bivalve mollusks, especially for marine species that live buried in mud or sand and have valves (the two pieces of the shell) of equal size.
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. Its two shells, enclosing only the front end of the body, function as a tool, rather than a protective covering; their ridged and roughened surfaces are used for boring. The burrow (lined with a calcareous coating produced by the clam's mantle) is begun when the animal is in its larval stage and is expanded as it grows. The common shipworm of the North Atlantic Ocean, Teredo navalis, may grow up to 2 ft (60 cm) long, although its shells remain only 1-2 in. (12 mm) long. Shipworms feed on wood particles and minute organisms. They do enormous damage to piers and ships, and although they are deterred by chemicals, control is still a problem. Shipworms are classified in the phylum MolluscaMollusca
, taxonomic name for the one of the largest phyla of invertebrate animals (Arthropoda is the largest) comprising more than 50,000 living mollusk species and about 35,000 fossil species dating back to the Cambrian period.
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, class Pelecypoda or Bivalvia, order Eulamellibranchia, family Teredinidae.

shipworm

[′ship‚wərm]
(invertebrate zoology)
Any of several bivalve mollusk species belonging to the family Teredinidae and which superficially resemble earthworms because the two valves are reduced to a pair of plates at the anterior of the animal or are used for boring into wood.
References in periodicals archive ?
If you thought the giant shipworm couldn't get any stranger, think again.
Quirks of ocean currents may have turned the waters around Antarctica into a rare sanctuary for wooden shipwrecks, free of the destructive mollusks known as shipworms.
The research team initially focused on shipworms because the animals' creative use of bacteria to convert wood - a poor food source lacking proteins or nitrogen - into a suitable food source where the animal can both live and feed.
The said river is heavily infested with Shipworms (broma)[illegible] in the port for the ship, it would be [illegible] if this is the be [illegible] to seek amore healthful place with a better port in the future."
Marine borer damage, including gribble and shipworm damage, could be observed in old piling stubs along the shoreline and in driftwood samples in the area.
Its hull was made of oak,and to protect it from shipworm,or teredo navalis, which burrows into timber, it was completely sheathed below the waterline in copper.
"In the sea there are several animals that burrow into and live in wood under the water; the commonest of these are the teredo, or shipworm, and the gribble," Edlin and Nimmo say.
There are many more AIS that are common to two or more states in the coastal West: hydrilla, zebra mussel, spartina, purple loosestrife, Asian copepod, milfoil, Asian clam, Manila clam, and shipworm are just a very few.(142) AIS statistics in the coastal West are alarming.
Uptake and utilization of amino acids by the shipworm Bankia gouldi.
Destruction caused by Teredo (shipworm), a type of mollusk, can often be more serious because they bore into the wood and hollow it out from the inside.