shop


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shop

1. a place, esp a small building, for the retail sale of goods and services
2. shut up shop to close business at the end of the day or permanently

Shop

 

the basic production subdivision of an industrial enterprise. As part of the overall process of production, shops perform certain specific functions in the manufacture of products and the delivery of technological or auxiliary services to primary production or to the enterprise as a whole. Depending on their functions, shops are divided into primary production shops, auxiliary shops, servicing shops, subordinate shops, and ancillary (or byproduct) shops.

Primary production shops (osnovnye tsekhi) are those engaged in the technological process of manufacturing the enterprise’s product. In metallurgical plants, for example, such shops include the blast-furnace, open-hearth, and rolling shops. In machine-building enterprises the primary production shops are subdivided into blanking (or die-cutting), machining, and assembly shops.

Auxiliary shops (vspomogatel’nye tsekhi) provide technical services to the primary production shops or to the entire enterprise. Their function is to repair buildings and equipment, manufacture and repair technological equipment for the primary production shops, and supply the enterprise with all forms of energy.

Servicing shops (obsluzhivaiushchie tsekhi) and annexes perform maintenance and, in part, technical functions in servicing the primary production shops and the entire plant. Such services include the acceptance, storage, distribution, and transportation of raw materials, other materials, fuel, semifinished and finished products, and waste products (plant warehousing and transportation).

Subordinate shops (podsobnye tsekhi) include shops engaged in the preparation of packing and crating materials and containers—that is, products needed for the release of the primary production output.

Ancillary shops (pobochnye tsekhi), which contribute to the total output by manufacturing by-products, include slag shops in metallurgical plants and the salvaging shops (that is, shops that manufacture consumer goods) in machine-building plants.

The shop categories differ in the various enterprises, depending on the branch of industry, the type of product, and the scale and methods of production. Large shops are subdivided into departments, sections, and assembly lines. Small enterprises sometimes operate on a nonshop basis—that is, without any shops at all.

REFERENCE

Organizatsiia i planirovanie mashinostroitel’nogo proizvodstva, 3rd ed. Moscow, 1974.
References in classic literature ?
The shop was crammed with customers, and there were crowds of mice upon the biscuit canisters.
"Let him stay," said David, with desperate resignation, frightened above all things at the idea of further disturbances in his shop, which would make his exposure all the more conspicuous.
The rector disliked the sight of a man who had imposed upon him; and all boys who could not afford to purchase, hooted "David Faux" as they passed his shop. Certainly no man now would pay anything for the "goodwill" of Mr.
In a few months the shop in the marketplace was again to let, and Mr.
The shops were first tried, but the shops, in the autumn of 1830, offered indifferent resources for the seller.
Adrienne's necessities had made her acquainted with several jewellers' shops. To one of these she now proceeded, and, first observing through the window that no person was in but one of her own sex, the silversmith's wife, she entered with the greater confidence and alacrity.
But he thought it better not to ask the question; and walked back to the shop: thinking over all he had seen and heard.
Not, however, towards the 'shops' where cunning artificers work in pearls and diamonds and gold and silver, making their hands so rich, that the enriched water in which they wash them is bought for the refiners;--not towards these does Mr Wegg stump, but towards the poorer shops of small retail traders in commodities to eat and drink and keep folks warm, and of Italian frame-makers, and of barbers, and of brokers, and of dealers in dogs and singing-birds.
Come in through the shop if t'other door's out of order!" we all went in, stimulated by Richard's laughing encouragement and relying on his protection.
"It's true enough," he said, going before us with the lantern, "that they call me the lord chancellor and call my shop Chancery.
He had by this time led us across the shop, and now opened a door in the back part of it, leading to the house-entry.
"He come in at the door," said the old man, slowly pointing an imaginary track along the shop, "on the day he did it--the whole neighbourhood had said for months before that he would do it, of a certainty sooner or later--he come in at the door that day, and walked along there, and sat himself on a bench that stood there, and asked me (you'll judge I was a mortal sight younger then) to fetch him a pint of wine.