shore bird

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shore bird,

common name for members of the large order Charadriiformes, which includes birds found on coasts and beaches throughout the world. Included in this group are the avocetavocet
, common name for a long-legged wading bird about 15 to 18 in. (37.5–45 cm) long, related to the snipe and belonging to the same family as the stilt. The American avocet or blacknecked stilt, Himantopus mexicanus,
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, curlewcurlew
, common name for large shore birds of both hemispheres, generally brown and buff in color and with decurved bills. There are eight species, belonging to the genus Numenius. The long-billed curlew, N.
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, oyster catcheroyster catcher,
common name for members of the family Haematopodidae, ploverlike shorebirds, cosmopolitan in distribution. Their distinctive red bills are long, blunt, and flattened, efficient for catching and opening the oysters, mussels, and clams on which they feed.
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, phalaropephalarope
, common name for members of the family Phalaropodidae, shore birds, called "little swimming sandpipers." Phalaropes, small, dainty birds with webbed toes, are the most aquatic of the shore bird group.
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, ploverplover
, common name for some members of the large family Charadriidae, shore birds, small to medium in size, found in ice-free lands all over the world. Plovers are plumpish wading birds with pigeonlike bills and strong markings of black or brown above with white below.
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, sandpipersandpiper,
common name for some members of the large family Scolopacidae, small shore birds, including the snipe and the curlew. Sandpipers are wading birds with relatively long legs and long, slender bills for probing in the sand or mud for their prey—all sorts of small
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, snipesnipe,
common name for a shore bird of the family Scolopacidae (sandpiper family), native to the Old and New Worlds. The common, or Wilson's snipe (Capella gallinago), also called jacksnipe, is a game bird of marshes and meadows.
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, and stiltstilt,
common name for some members of the family Recurvirostridae, shore birds including the avocet. Stilts, as their name implies, have the longest legs of any bird except the flamingo.
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. The similarity and close relationship of these birds is illustrated by the surf birds, which are also called plover-billed turnstones and are considered by some to be intermediate between plovers and turnstones and by others to be most closely allied to the sandpipers. The godwits, which migrate from subarctic regions S to Africa, Australia, and New Zealand and can travel more than 7,000 mi (11,300 km) nonstop, are related to the curlews but resemble the phalaropes in their breeding and nesting habits. Shore birds in general are shy, inconspicuously marked birds with long, slender bills for probing the sand or mud for food and relatively long, strong legs for wading and running. The order Charadriiformes is classified in the phylum ChordataChordata
, phylum of animals having a notochord, or dorsal stiffening rod, as the chief internal skeletal support at some stage of their development. Most chordates are vertebrates (animals with backbones), but the phylum also includes some small marine invertebrate animals.
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, subphylum Vertebrata, class Aves.

shore bird

[′shȯr ‚bərd]
(vertebrate zoology)
A general term applied to a large number of birds in 12 families of the suborder Charadrii which are always found near water, although the habitat and morphology is varied. Also known as wader.
References in periodicals archive ?
Shorebirds feed in intertidal areas or around freshwater wetlands, and make up around 10 per cent of all birds in Australia.
Penner hopes the day of recognition will help connect people to shorebird conservation on a global scale.
Therefore, this study showed that the tide does influence the shorebird's abundance and behavior whereas time of the day does not have significant effect on both shorebird's abundance and behavior.
The national park's isolated sand flats and mangroves provide essential habitat for thousands of shorebirds representing 13 species, including the largest congregation of the endangered piping plover outside the U.S.
"Volunteers are essential for the protection of the breeding shorebirds. Engaging beach-users about the significance of the fenced off areas and the importance for dog walkers to keep their dogs on leads makes a huge difference to breeding success.
In fall, we found that shorebird and duck densities were similar between wetlands and flooded croplands, suggesting that flooding cropland can provide surrogate wetland habitat for these species during migration.
Backed by a rich theoretical framework (Alerstam and Lindstrom, 1990; Hedenstrom, 2008), many studies of shorebird migration have focused on the decisions birds make in choosing both sites at which to stop and how long to reside at a given site (e.g., Gudmundsson et al., 1991; Warnock and Bishop, 1998; Farmer and Wiens, 1999).
To gain insight into avian influenza virus (AIV) transmission, exposure, and maintenance patterns in shorebirds at Delaware Bay during spring migration, we examined temporal AIV prevalence trends in 4 Charadriiformes species with the use of serial cross-sectional data from 2000 through 2008 and generalized linear and additive models.
* Restoring ponds to historic tidal marsh will remove shorebird and duck habitat.
Only one in four chicks survives to become a breeding adult, according to Francie Cuthbert, a professor at the University of Minnesota and an expert on shorebird populations and management.