shoreline


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shoreline

the edge of a body of water
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Shoreline

 

the line of intersection between the surface of a sea or lake and the surface of the land. It is the boundary of a given water basin. Since the level of large water basins changes even over short intervals of time, the concept of a shoreline is arbitrary; it is applied with respect to the average location of the water level over many years. Ancient shorelines, which are also encountered within the boundaries of a shore, were established by the extension of various ancient forms of coastal relief. The study of ancient shorelines provides material to clarify the history of the development of the shore and water basin as a whole; it also makes it possible to draw conclusions with respect to the nature and rates of vertical movements of the crust.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

shoreline

[′shȯr‚līn]
(geology)
The intersection of a specified plane of water, especially mean high water, with the shore; a limit which changes with the tide or water level. Also known as strandline; waterline.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

shoreline

A line following the general contour of the shore, except that in cases of inlets or bays less than 30 NM in width, the line shall pass directly across the inlet or bay to intersect the general contour on the opposite side (ICAO).
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
And such 'invasion' of the shorelines and river banks within the city's urban center is not exclusive of the supposed landless families.
Fully functioning shorelines and associated floodplains provide a place for rivers and streams to safely fluctuate, protecting properties downstream.
Our site has about a mile of shoreline to cover, so having more volunteers allows us to do a more thorough job and in less time."
"These shorelines could have been emplaced by a large body of liquid water that existed before and during the emplacement of Tharsis, instead of afterwards," Robert Citron, a graduate student at the university and first author of the paper, said in the statement.
Water-Index-Based Method for Mapping the First Shoreline. NDWI is a remote-sensing-derived index for detecting water features such as oceans, rivers, lakes, and reservoirs from multispectral image sources by using their spectral bands [5, 16, 19, 20].
Travel blogger Laila Swann added: "I've used Dr Holmes's report and the science behind the equation to identify the top 10 shorelines in the world and having travelled to Dubai in March this year, I can certainly vouch for its sensational shoreline.
In a landscape that could almost have been imaged by Mars rovers, Christine Chen examines stony deposits called tufas along the now dried-up shoreline of an ancient lake high atop the Andes Mountains of northern Chile.
Kathryn Sue Simmerman, the former manager of the $16.3 million Shoreline Federal Credit Union, admitted in U.S.
The Shoreline Scholars program is aimed at students with a grade-point average of at least 3.5 and some financial need.
Shoreline said it has introduced an off-the-shelf portfolio designed for regional and community banks to enable transitions to chip and PIN or chip and signature technology.