short shrift


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Related to short shrift: heads up, get short shrift, give short shrift

short shrift

(formerly) a brief period allowed to a condemned prisoner to make confession
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
In Ilana Zinguer's edition of the proceed-kings f an international conference on Montaigne, Le lecteur, l'auteur et l'ecrivain: Montaigne, 1492-1592-1992 (Paris: Champion, 1993), the theme of the New World receives short shrift. It is subsumed under the amorphous heading of "Montaigne and the Other," a topic so broad that it permitted such scholars as Eva Kushner, Claude-Gilbert Dubols, and Francois Rigolot to discuss (respectively) the author as other, Montaigne and the supernatural, and Montaigne's interpretation of La Boetie's Servitude volontaire--topics far removed from the ostensible theme of the New World.
Bet he'd get short shrift if he took along those flowery trunks, though...
But Tanya Robinson, prosecuting, told Maidstone crown court: "Mr Cooke indicated that had he been approached by the three they would have got short shrift. He said: 'I'm probably the most racist person you have met'."
And just like his predecessor, Alvin gets short shrift from the fearsome Nora Batty as Kathy Staff is returning to her wrinkled-stocking role after a year away in daytime soap Crossroads.
And he gave short shrift to those in the England party who claim they require patience as they build for the future with new young talent.
But their coach Giovanni Trappatoni received short shrift from the Treble winners.
Bayern coach Ottmar Hitzfeld will get short shrift from Alex Ferguson for his sales pitch.
This is a technical and managerial manual, with architectural issues getting short shrift.
Between that, and the gargantuan coverage given to J-Lo and Ben, the environment gets very short shrift in the mainstream media.
Class is given relatively short shrift in this volume, with the exception of Spear's work and of a piece by Jacquelyn C.
For instance, while Anthony Davies' entry for Henry VI, part one gives no fewer than ten works of representative criticism relating to that play, his entry for Henry V lists only two: Meron's book on Henry's Wars and, oddly, Battenhouse's 1963 essay on the play as "heroic comedy." It is difficult to explain not only the inequity of critical bibliography in the two entries--one would expect, for example, the imbalance to go in Henry V's favor--but also why Henry V received such short shrift when it has been so central to recent discussions of power and politics in Shakespeare's dramatic worlds.
This is not to say that the little girls will get short shrift. While the show includes a few of Dodgson's photographs of adults, boys, and prehistoric skeletons, as well as some pictures by his contemporaries--Julia Margaret Cameron, Roger Fenton, and David Wilkie Wynfield, among others--it is almost wholly devoted to Dodgson's pictures of girls playing beggars, princesses, dreamers, and sleepers.