short-range forecast

short-range forecast

[′shȯrt ¦rānj ′fȯr‚kast]
(meteorology)
A weather forecast made for a time period generally not greater than 48 hours in advance.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The first thing we did after disembarking from the Caledonian Sleeper train at Inverness was consult a local for a short-range forecast before the three-hour drive to Skye.
The National Weather Service's short-range forecast discussion is a good place to start when you have a flight coming up.
The report concludes with a short-range forecast of developments in the sector in Russia.
Such a short-range forecast could be helpful in determining the resources required to treat those infected in the attack, although once a widespread response to the attack is mounted (e.g., distribution of antimicrobial agents, in the case of anthrax), the forecasts lose their validity (8).
* The company is already using a short-range planner or budget program, or has developed internal software programs to handle the short-range forecast.
2013), having 1.5-km grid length in the interior stretching to 4 km at the boundaries; the UKV currently operates with a 3-h three-dimensional variational data assimilation (3D-Var) analysis cycle, which at the time of writing is about to include a 1-h four-dimensional variational data assimilation (4D-Var) analysis cycle for short-range forecast (out to T+ 12 h).
Initial results have shown short-range forecast impacts larger than from any other moisture observations, including twice-daily raobs.
Schlatter, 2010: Relative short-range forecast impact from aircraft, profiler, radiosonde, VAD, GPS-PW, METAR, and mesonet observations via the RUC hourly assimilation cycle.
8b displays the reduction of short-range forecast errors when observations from individual wind profilers are assimilated into NWP models using the forecast sensitivity to observation (FS0) method (Cardinali 2009; Lorenc and Marriott 2014).
If we can show that short-range forecasts from an initial flow situation, such as the trough/CAPE synoptic pattern, are unreliable owing to deficiencies in uncertainty growth rates (too much or too little), then this will imply that ensemble forecasts that predict a high likelihood of a trough/CAPE situation at any lead time will become unreliable after this lead time (in an area expanding from the likely trough/CAPE event).

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