short-termism


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short-termism

the tendency to focus attention on short-term gains, often at the expense of long-term success or stability
References in periodicals archive ?
Kaplan concludes with other stylized facts that are also inconsistent with the short-termism argument.
There has been a recognition that short-termism is a problem," says Martin Lipton, a founding partner of Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz, who specializes in advising major corporations on mergers and acquisitions and corporate policy and strategy.
The authors say short-termism isn't necessarily bad but that there is now an overemphasis on it as mar- keters veer from one strategy to another rather than exploiting the accumulated learning about their brands.
But it's hard to see Real's latest triumph as anything other than a victory for deep pockets and short-termism over stability and teamwork.
Short-termism, of course, isn't just a problem for Wall Street.
David Reid was on the working group tasked with fixing Club Academy Scotland - but he doesn't believe they went far enough to drum the short-termism out of our clubs.
As a company owner, there is no room for short-termism.
The short-termism of Premier League football is illustrated by the fact that Sam Allardyce, who only became Sunderland manager last month, is ninth favourite with some bookies at 25/1 to get the chop next.
Short-termism is not good in a personal life, a business or a Government and it's time to step up.
Armed with deep research platforms and enough patience to let their good ideas play out, skilled active managers have perhaps the greatest capacity to win the war against an investor's most powerful enemy these days -- market short-termism.
With their eye on the next election, decisions inevitably veer towards short-termism " five years is definitely short term in the course of a nation's life.
A: This is short-termism by management, and the effects of this on companies can be stark.