shotgun house

(redirected from Shotgun shack)
Also found in: Dictionary, Idioms.

shotgun house

Built primarily in the rural southern regions of the United States from the late 1800s to the early 1900s, a one- or one-and-a-half-story house (commonly supported on short piers), one room wide and several rooms deep, with all rooms and their doors in a straight line perpendicular to the street; a narrow gable front with a porch, and often with a similar porch at the rear.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
So, in this show, we saw Bought White, 2008, an image of a pottery cat tinted with sickly greens and browns; Dream in Snow, 2008, a roughed-up winter landscape centered on a shotgun shack; and Pink Fader, 2007, a tiny, gauzy study of a blank-faced Superman.
The 15-acre property purchased for the park included Elvis's first home, and today more than 60,000 tourists and fans take the exit off US 78 to Elvis Presley Boulevard each year, headed for the tiny shotgun shack at the end of the road.
Ethel, their daughter, was born on August 29, 1931 in Mauls Swamp, North Carolina, where they lived in a shotgun shack (you could fire a shot in the front door and it would exit the back without hitting anything), owned by the Laughinghouse family.
Buddy's a blues fan, with poster's and album covers decorating his shotgun shack and outhouse in Mississippi.
The watchman walked on, past heaps of shale half covered with grass, past a huge steel tank upended in a ditch, past the sludge pond and a yellow shotgun shack where no one was stirring.
This isn't your stereotypical driving range -- you know, the kind with a shotgun shack, a caretaker puffing on a cigar and calling you "Pard," golf balls that look like they were in Ben Hogan's bag in the 1940s and clubs that have met the rock-hard ground far too many times.
music Lil Jimmy Reed and The 'A' Team From shotgun shack and cotton field to festival main stage, the prodigious talents of Lil Jimmy Reed have taken him a long way from the Mississippi river.
Raised in a tiny shotgun shack in Arkansas, Cash campaigned for the rights of prisoners, overcame years of depression and susbstance abuse, and praised his second wife, singer June, who had died in May 2003, as his saviour and inspiration.
Central to the exhibition is a "shotgun shack", a traditional two or three roomed American farmer's dwelling, where all the rooms were connected in a straight line.
The purple, blue, red, orange, and yellow shotgun shack is equipped with a satellite dish and a rainwater-gathering apparatus, reflecting the environmentally committed, do-it-yourself approach of some New Orleans residents.