shot

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shot

1
1. 
a. a single photograph
b. a series of frames on cine film concerned with a single event
c. a length of film taken by a single camera without breaks, used with others to build up a full motion picture or television film
2. Sport a heavy metal ball used in the shot put
3. globules of metal occurring in the body of a casting that are harder than the rest of the casting
4. a unit of chain length equal to 75 feet (Brit) or 90 feet (US)

shot

2
1. (of textiles) woven to give a changing colour effect
2. streaked with colour

Shot

 

in film-making, the placement of a subject in a frame of film and also the scale of representation. The distinction between close-ups, medium shots, and long shots is based on the position of the subject. There are also big, medium, and general shots, depending on scale. Varying shots is a basic technique in the pictorial and sequential composition of scenes and episodes in a film.


Shot

 

a spherical, solid, nonexplosive projectile used in smoothbore artillery and firearms. In the mid-14th century shot was made of stone; iron was used in the 15th century and was subsequently replaced by pig iron (for large-caliber guns) and lead (for small-caliber weapons). Incandescent incendiary shot came into use in the 16th century, and in the 17th century hollow shot filled with explosive powder—grenades—was widely used. Shot became obsolete in the second half of the 19th century when smooth bores were replaced by rifled bores.

shot

[shät]
(aerospace engineering)
An act or instance of firing a rocket, especially from the earth's surface.
(engineering)
A charge of some kind of explosive.
Small spherical particles of steel.
Small steel balls used as the cutting agent of a shot drill.
The firing of a blast.
In plastics molding, the yield from one complete molding cycle, including scrap.
(mining engineering)
Coal broken by blasting or other methods.
(ordnance)
A solid projectile for cannon, without a bursting charge; the term projectile is preferred for uniformity in nomenclature.
A mass or load of numerous, relatively small, lead pellets used in a shotgun, as birdshot or buckshot.
References in classic literature ?
So saying, and without showing the least anxiety to pause upon his aim, Locksley stept to the appointed station, and shot his arrow as carelessly in appearance as if he had not even looked at the mark.
As they came down they became audible as a complex of shootings and vast creakings and groanings and beatings and throbbings and shouts and shots.
The red warrior in the plaza fired several more shots, none of which scored.
So it happened that even before Jane Clayton fired the first shot into Rokoff's canoe the beasts of Tarzan had disappeared into the jungle.
One was dead, but the other was still conscious and had just sufficient vitality left after the coming of his fellows to whisper that they had been treacherously shot by the younger white man who had been at the long-house where they had found Muda Saffir--then the fellow expired without having an opportunity to divulge the secret hiding place of the treasure, over the top of which his body lay.
When each had proceeded ten paces D'Arnot was to give the final signal--then they were to turn and fire at will until one fell, or each had expended the three shots allowed.
More in whim than in hope of result, grinning to himself as he did so, Sheldon raised his automatic pistol and in two seconds sent eight shots scattering through the trees in the direction in which Tudor had disappeared.
The boat's crew were not even fair shots, but Van Horn, like every captain in the Solomons, knew that the bush natives and salt-water men were so much worse shots, and knew that the shooting of his boat's crew could be depended upon--if the boat's crew itself did not turn against the ship in a pinch.
But I say, you know, I heard shots," Bertie said, in trembling eagerness, for he scented adventure, and adventure that was happily over with.
The top bar of the fence was four feet high, but he knew his roan and leaped it at full career to the accompaniment of several scattered shots.
Immediately afterwards revolver shots rang out and there was a great noise of tables and furniture being thrown to the ground, as if in the course of a struggle, and again the voice of Mademoiselle calling, "Murder
Which of you will begin the epic of missed putts and brassey shots which failed by a foot to carry?