shower meteor

shower meteor

See meteor shower.

shower meteor

[′shau̇·ər ‚mēd·ē·ər]
(astronomy)
A meteor whose direction of arrival is approximately parallel to others belonging to the same meteor shower.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Frankie Lucena captured this image of a shower meteor over Cabo Rojo, Puerto Rico, during a full Moon on December 14, 2016.
Shower meteors may appear anywhere in the sky, but their direction of motion can be traced back to the constellation whose name the shower bears.
Geminids are slower and more graceful than the quick zips of most shower meteors.
Shower meteors can appear anywhere in the sky, but their direction of motion can always be traced back to the constellation whose name the shower bears.
He saw only three possible shower meteors with an average brightness of magnitude 2.
Shower meteors can appear anywhere in the sky, but their direction of motion is away from the constellation whose name the shower bears.
The ZHR is the number of shower meteors an observer would see under ideal conditions with the shower's radiant overhead.
Although shower meteors can appear anywhere in the sky, the effect of perspective makes their apparent lines of flight seem to originate from a common point, called the radiant.
Under excellent conditions a trained meteor observer can discriminate shower meteors from the random, sporadic ones, while detecting rates as low as 1/10 the current radar threshold.
We simply seek to determine whether observed shower meteors are separated by random time intervals.
On the morning of October 23rd Tennessee amateur Jimmy Dietrich watched the Orionids for only a half hour yet saw 15 shower meteors.
Accurate magnitude estimates of shower meteors are especially desirable; so are photographs.