shower meteor

shower meteor

See meteor shower.

shower meteor

[′shau̇·ər ‚mēd·ē·ər]
(astronomy)
A meteor whose direction of arrival is approximately parallel to others belonging to the same meteor shower.
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References in periodicals archive ?
You may see the occasional shower meteor during the week before and after the peak as well.
Perseids begin streaking across the sky in mid-July, when the radiant is still in Cassiopeia, and the odd shower meteor will continue to be visible until around August 24th.
Frankie Lucena captured this image of a shower meteor over Cabo Rojo, Puerto Rico, during a full Moon on December 14, 2016.
Shower meteors may appear anywhere in the sky, but their direction of motion can be traced back to the constellation whose name the shower bears.
Shower meteors can appear anywhere in the sky, but their direction of motion is away from the constellation whose name the shower bears.
Geminids are slower and more graceful than the quick zips of most shower meteors. Geminids plunge into our atmosphere at 35 kilometers (22 miles) per second, compared to 60 km per second for Perseids, 66 for Orionids, and 71 for Leonids.
"It was clear all the way to the coast," he writes, "which allowed light pollution to pour into the western sky." He saw only three possible shower meteors with an average brightness of magnitude 2.
(The ZHR is the number of shower meteors an observer would see under ideal conditions with the shower's radiant overhead.) However, a team of Dutch meteor specialists, observing from northern France, witnessed faint Leonids in abundance from 3:30 to 5:00 UT, with a ZHR near or exceeding 100.
Under excellent conditions a trained meteor observer can discriminate shower meteors from the random, sporadic ones, while detecting rates as low as 1/10 the current radar threshold.
We simply seek to determine whether observed shower meteors are separated by random time intervals.
On the morning of October 23rd Tennessee amateur Jimmy Dietrich watched the Orionids for only a half hour yet saw 15 shower meteors. He was especially fortunate, considering that from his highly obstructed home site he could see only Cassiopeia and Perseus.
Accurate magnitude estimates of shower meteors are especially desirable; so are photographs.