show

(redirected from shows)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Idioms.

show

1. a theatrical or other entertainment
2. a sporting event consisting of contests in which riders perform different exercises to show their skill and their horses' ability and breeding
3. stop the show Informal (of a stage act, etc.) to receive so much applause as to interrupt the performance

Show

 

(in Russian, obozrenie), a variety or theater presentation that consists of separate scenes and variety, choreographic, instrumental, and vocal numbers. The elements of a show are united by a common theme.

Shows first appeared in the 1830’s in France under the name of revues and had a topical interest, but at the end of the 19th century the revue was transformed into a simple entertainment vehicle. In the Soviet theater and the theater of socialist countries, such as Poland and Rumania, shows are comic and satiric presentations. They are part of the repertoire of variety theaters, music halls, and theaters of miniature genres, such as the Leningrad Theater of Variety and Miniature Genres.

References in classic literature ?
In the first place attempts have been made to show that "Hesiod" is a significant name and therefore fictitious: it is only necessary to mention Goettling's derivation from IEMI to ODOS (which would make `Hesiod' mean the
There is one thing, I hope--that you don't show any of my letters to William Platt.
Thereafter, I showed how the greatest part of the matter of this chaos must, in accordance with these laws, dispose and arrange itself in such a way as to present the appearance of heavens; how in the meantime some of its parts must compose an earth and some planets and comets, and others a sun and fixed stars.
To begin by bluster, but afterwards to take fright at the enemy's numbers, shows a supreme lack of intelligence.
He grows so tired of that unceasing question sometimes, that he dreads to show us any thing at all.
"Nay, gentlemen," cries Jones, "I can never maintain my opinion against so many; indeed, if the generality of his audience dislike him, the learned gentleman who conducts the show might have done very right in dismissing Punch from his service."
Don Quixote at once asked the landlord what this Master Pedro was, and what was the show and what was the ape he had with him; which the landlord replied, "This is a famous puppet-showman, who for some time past has been going about this Mancha de Aragon, exhibiting a show of the release of Melisendra by the famous Don Gaiferos, one of the best and best-represented stories that have been seen in this part of the kingdom for many a year; he has also with him an ape with the most extraordinary gift ever seen in an ape or imagined in a human being; for if you ask him anything, he listens attentively to the question, and then jumps on his master's shoulder, and pressing close to his ear tells him the answer which Master Pedro then delivers.
One of the strongest instances of an animal apparently performing an action for the sole good of another, with which I am acquainted, is that of aphides voluntarily yielding their sweet excretion to ants: that they do so voluntarily, the following facts show. I removed all the ants from a group of about a dozen aphides on a dock-plant, and prevented their attendance during several hours.
My master's design was to show me in all the towns by the way, and to step out of the road for fifty or a hundred miles, to any village, or person of quality's house, where he might expect custom.
On the way to dinner the Admiral showed him where to buy gloves, and made him buy them; where to buy cigars, and made him buy a vast store, some of which he obligingly accepted.
However often she told herself that she must not get irritable when teaching her nephew, almost every time that, pointer in hand, she sat down to show him the French alphabet, she so longed to pour her own knowledge quickly and easily into the child- who was already afraid that Auntie might at any moment get angry- that at his slightest inattention she trembled, became flustered and heated, raised her voice, and sometimes pulled him by the arm and put him in the corner.
According to legend we once had a servant - in my childhood I could show the mark of it on my forehead, and even point her out to other boys, though she was now merely a wife with a house of her own.