shrine


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shrine:

see pilgrimpilgrim,
one who travels to a shrine or other sacred place out of religious motives. Pilgrimages are a feature of many religions and cultures. Examples in ancient Greece were the pilgrimages to Eleusis and Delphi. Pilgrimages are well established in India (e.g.
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.

Shrine

A place, building, or structure made sacred by association with a historic event or holy personage; an altar, tomb, or chapel.

Shrine

 

a large casket in the form of a sarcophagus or box, or sometimes an architectural structure, often decorated with various pictures, precious stones, and the like and used to hold the remains of saints.

Shrines were set up in churches, usually in an elevated place under a canopy. Some shrines have great aesthetic value, such as the shrine of St. Sebaldus in the Church of St. Sebaldus in Nuremberg (bronze, 1508–19; sculptors, P. Fischer and sons) and the shrine of St. Sergius of Radonezh in the Trinity Cathedral of the St. Sergius Trinity Monastery (silver, 16th century, with a silver canopy from the 18th century).

shrine

A receptacle to contain sacred relics; by extension, a building for that purpose.

shrine

1. a place of worship hallowed by association with a sacred person or object
2. a container for sacred relics
3. the tomb of a saint or other holy person
4. RC Church a building, alcove, or shelf arranged as a setting for a statue, picture, or other representation of Christ, the Virgin Mary, or a saint
References in periodicals archive ?
Tradition says the shrine, which draws Shiite pilgrims from throughout the Islamic world, is near the place where the last of the 12 Shiite imams, Mohammed al-Mahdi, disappeared.
Earlier yesterday they offered to give control of the shrine to Shiite religious authorities, who accepted the offer in principle.
Koizumi has gone to the Yasukuni Shrine four times since becoming prime minister.
He does, however, make the surprising claim that "by 2000 Gettysburg was a less-democratic shrine than it had been a century earlier" Could that possibly be true?
The clan's shrine complex became the site of a great government sponsored matsuri.
Licano erected the shrine in 1977 with the help of a friend to fulfill a vow.
There is virtually no consideration of the other shrines that were popular in medieval England, for instance the Marian shrine at Walsingham and the supposedly miraculous Blood at Hailes.
The discovery supports oral and written tradition saying the main shrine was some 48 meters high, double the height of the current building and surpassing the 46-meter great Buddha hall in Todaiji Temple in Nara Prefecture, which houses the 15-meter great Buddha, created in 752.
The original shrine of gold and silver for the bell is in a London museum.
In ancient times it was the shrine for the settlement of Takanashi.
Also troubling is the assumed elision of the shrine of a saint and the tombs of ordinary mortals, when one might expect quite different functions and visual conventions to be in force.