shungite

shungite

[′shəŋ‚īt]
(geology)
A hard, black, amorphous, coallike material composed of more than 98% carbon.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The spa treatment commences with a foot steam using ancient shungite stones that absorb negative energy, anxiety and depression.
Before bedtime, Nadine Abramcyk, a founder of Tenoverten, an all-natural luxury nail salon, puts her iPhone on aeroplane mode and covers it with a shungite crystal to reduce radiation.
According to scholars, even if shungite has been around for billions of years, the present comprehension of this promising mineral is underway.
In this study, we explored the therapeutic in vivo effects of shungite against UVB-induced skin damage comparing the antioxidant power of mineral-rich shungite and mineral-less shungite with commercially available fullerene C60.
Recently a client submitted some pieces of a black gem material they called shungite. Initially we thought they were jet, but the gemmological properties were different.
According to information given in Reznikov and Polekhovskii (2000), shungite has an RI of 1.6, SG values between 1.83 and 1.96, and IR absorption between 1580 and 1575 [cm.sup.-1].
Among the topics are Bessel plasmons for near-field optical microscopy with nanoscale resolution, charge accumulation and edge state transport in graphene nanoribbons, experiment and modeling microwave absorption in pyrolytic carbon nanofilms, ion-selective detection with a glass nanopipette for living cells, electrokinetic properties of aluminum nanopowders in citric acid solution, and the effect of annealing on the shielding properties of shungite. ([umlaut] Ringgold, Inc., Portland, OR)
(2.) "Fine Shungite powders--advanced fillers of polyfunctional action for elastomer composites," B.S.
(5.) "Prospective use of Shungite filler in rubber and polymer composition," A.B.
The first report of a natural occurrence was in 1992 from shungite, found as inclusions in diabase, in the Lake Onega region of Karelian, Russia.
Buseck and his collegues at Arizona State University in Tempe identified the first naturally occurring fullerenes in a rock from Russia called shungite (SN: 7/11/92, p.20).
Buseck at Arizona State University in Tempe, has found 60-and 70-carbon fullerenes in the film that lines tiny cracks of a shiny black rock called shungite. The researchers report the finding in the July 10 SCIENCE.