sibyl


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sibyl

(sĭb`ĭl), in classical mythology and religion, prophetess. There were said to be as many as 10 sibyls, variously located and represented. The most famous was the Cumaean sibyl, described by Vergil in the Aeneid. When she offered Tarquin her prophetic writings, the so-called sibylline books, he refused to pay her high price. She kept burning the books until finally he bought the remaining three at the original price. Although the historical origins of the books are uncertain, they were actually kept at Rome in the Capitol and were consulted by the state in times of emergency. The books were destroyed in the burning of the Capitol in 83 B.C., but a new collection was made. This was burned in A.D. 405. The sibyls achieved a stature in Christian literature and art similar to that of the Old Testament prophets.

Sibyl

A woman in Greek and Roman mythology reputed to possess powers of prophecy and divination.

Sibyl

 

any of several legendary prophetesses mentioned in works by classical writers.

The most famous sibyl was from the city of Cumae in Italy; according to legend, her predictions were gathered into collections of prophecies, the Sibylline Books. During the reigns of the legendary Roman kings Tarquinius Superbus and Tarqui-nius Priscus (seventh-sixth centuries B.C.), these collections were brought to Rome and kept in a stone vault under the Temple of the Capitoline Jupiter; in 83 B.C.. they were destroyed during a fire. The books were compiled again and stored in the temple of Apollo on the Palatine; in AD. 405 these were burned by edict of Stilicho, ruler of the Western Roman Empire. The 12 surviving Sibylline Books, dating from the second century B.C.. to the second century AD., are a source for the history of the Judaic and Christian religions. Sibyls appear in paintings by Michelangelo, Tintoretto, Rembrandt and other artists.

sibyl

1. (in ancient Greece and Rome) any of a number of women believed to be oracles or prophetesses, one of the most famous being the sibyl of Cumae, who guided Aeneas through the underworld
2. a witch, fortune-teller, or sorceress
References in periodicals archive ?
Como el judio se empenaba en llamarme milord, tuve que asegurar a Sibyl que no era lord ni mucho menos.
Recognizing the Sibyl's cave to be a nexus of collapsed time-states, the cusp at which past, present, and future blend in an extraordinary continuum, the flame narrator describes her artistry in revising the sibylline leaves:
The Sibyl is one of the primary liminal figures in Book VI.
The sibyl's black stones are shown, as well as loaves of bread marked with dappled ink signets (which were baked by an uncanny masked pair in one scene in Ouroboros); objects finished in wax and reminiscent of the fossils of dinosaur nests also echo the film through their tactile components.
Sibyl Slade and Michael Milner of the Fed's Birmingham Branch joined with the Southeast District Office of NeighborWorks America to host a similar meeting for statewide stakeholders in Birmingham.
The paintings by Flower also include another one of Archelaus Carpenter's daughters, Sibyl, who married Samuel Cain, most likely a son of Loyalist John Cain UE who settled on the Washademoak, and another of James Green's daughters, also Sibyl, who married John Secord, (9) the son of Loyalist Elias Secord UE, (10) a blacksmith who served in the Prince of Wales American Regiment and who also settled in the area.
Wells's hostess, Lady Sibyl Colefax, headed for the air raid shelter, but her guest wouldn't budge.
Bought for 200 drachmas by Sibyl, a prophetess in training at Apollo's shrine at Delphi, he soon discovers that he and some unwashed goatherd are the only ones who can save the universe from total destruction.
The Princess will meet Winifred Colman from Durham and Sibyl Eltringham from Hartburn, Stockton, granddaughters of Peter Lee, the clean water crusader whose name was given to the County Durham new town.
To Sibyl and the Stockdale family, thank you for the profound honor you extend to all of us by allowing our Naval Service to share this day of remembrance with you.
Harriet Beecher Stowe, in her essay, "Sojourner Truth, The Libyan Sibyl," wrote: "She had things to say, and was ready to say them at all times, and to anyone."
The Sibyl Sanderson Story--Requiem for a Diva, An Authorized Biography