sibyl

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Related to sibylline: Sibylline Books, Sibylline oracles

sibyl

(sĭb`ĭl), in classical mythology and religion, prophetess. There were said to be as many as 10 sibyls, variously located and represented. The most famous was the Cumaean sibyl, described by Vergil in the Aeneid. When she offered Tarquin her prophetic writings, the so-called sibylline books, he refused to pay her high price. She kept burning the books until finally he bought the remaining three at the original price. Although the historical origins of the books are uncertain, they were actually kept at Rome in the Capitol and were consulted by the state in times of emergency. The books were destroyed in the burning of the Capitol in 83 B.C., but a new collection was made. This was burned in A.D. 405. The sibyls achieved a stature in Christian literature and art similar to that of the Old Testament prophets.

Sibyl

A woman in Greek and Roman mythology reputed to possess powers of prophecy and divination.

Sibyl

 

any of several legendary prophetesses mentioned in works by classical writers.

The most famous sibyl was from the city of Cumae in Italy; according to legend, her predictions were gathered into collections of prophecies, the Sibylline Books. During the reigns of the legendary Roman kings Tarquinius Superbus and Tarqui-nius Priscus (seventh-sixth centuries B.C.), these collections were brought to Rome and kept in a stone vault under the Temple of the Capitoline Jupiter; in 83 B.C.. they were destroyed during a fire. The books were compiled again and stored in the temple of Apollo on the Palatine; in AD. 405 these were burned by edict of Stilicho, ruler of the Western Roman Empire. The 12 surviving Sibylline Books, dating from the second century B.C.. to the second century AD., are a source for the history of the Judaic and Christian religions. Sibyls appear in paintings by Michelangelo, Tintoretto, Rembrandt and other artists.

sibyl

1. (in ancient Greece and Rome) any of a number of women believed to be oracles or prophetesses, one of the most famous being the sibyl of Cumae, who guided Aeneas through the underworld
2. a witch, fortune-teller, or sorceress
References in periodicals archive ?
Is the potential ties with the Catholic Church the one that led him to the mission of finding one of the Sibylline books?
The last king of ancient Rome, the legendary Tarquinius Superbus, was eager to acquire the nine Sibylline Books.
45) In Frogs, the agon between the two poets, although literary, is determined by a question that concerns the politics and the city; nevertheless, it is not the comic hero--and judge of the contest--who has the answers but Aeschylus whose sibylline response contrasts with Trygaeus's clarity.
5) Like that of Irene Chayes (only a year after Empson's), (6) this is a "Coleridgean" reading of early Coleridge, inasmuch as it applies to the Rime the elaborated clarities and energies of intellect which already shine through the lines of the poem's earliest version and at which the poet himself had largely arrived through the medium of his prose by the time of its most decisive (if not quite final) revision, published in Sibylline Leaves (1817).
3) A titre d'exemple, je cite le premier paragraphe d'une postface aussi touchante que sibylline dans laquelle Carbonnier rend hommage A un doctorant francais et explique pourquoi, s'il avait eu le choix, il aurait prefere etre invite aux travaux preparatoires de 1904 sur le Code civil francais plutot qu'A ceux de 1804 et de 1945 :
The woman who fills her notebooks with sibylline abstractions ("The world is a unique object--it is in this sense that it has no boundary") and she who compiles a list of childhood memories: "Sharing a room with Mother the first two years in Tucson.
Because an adventurous Englishwoman (who forthrightly protests her interpretative limitations) redacts the sibylline leaves she has found into Verney's plague-chronicle, The Last Man invites speculation on how a nightmarish future might look without requiring that this apocalypse be accepted as a direct revelation of literal truth.
Autre sibylline allusion, le 28 mai 1979, a Rouen, le President de La Republique, a l'occasion de son discours de l'inauguration du Memorial de Jeanne d'Arc, declarait quant a lui:
Unsurprisingly, apocalyptic literature (1 Enoch, Sibylline Oracles, Psalms of Solomon, 2 Baruch) falls mostly under the category of eschatological participation, while apologetic works tend to display sympathization, conversion, and ethical monotheism (Letter of Aristeas, Joseph and Aseneth).
58) avait appelees <<livre II de Frontin>> et que Thulin a refusees a cet auteur pour les attribuer a un fons optimus de la meme epoque flavienne--mais peu importe ici--l'expriment, a l'occasion d'un developpement sur la controverse de modo, en des phrases d'apparence tellement sibylline que meme F.
If we examine briefly the critical reception of Coleridge's return to poetry in 1816 and 1817, when he published the Christabel volume and Sibylline Leaves and established the poetic persona that would remain with him until after his death, we will find a surprising number of references that note stereotypically "unmanly" qualities of listlessness, chaotic thinking, coyness, and lack of resolve in him and his career.