sickle-cell disease


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Related to sickle-cell disease: cystic fibrosis, Sickle cell crisis

sickle-cell disease

[′sik·əl ¦sel di‚zēz]
(medicine)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
[USA], Sep 04 ( ANI ): A new study sheds light on how sickle-cell disease occurs when deformed red blood cells clump together, blocking tiny blood vessels and causing severe pain and swelling in the affected body parts.
have sickle-cell disease, most of them African-Americans and Latinos but also people of Middle Eastern, Asian, Indian, and Mediterranean descent.
Serjeant G Sickle-cell disease. The Lancet 1997;350:725-30
Children with sickle-cell disease face an unusually high risk from infection by the H1N1 flu virus, scientists reported December 6.
She talks about beauty basics, as well as major concerns affecting darker skins, such as the effects of sickle-cell disease, scars and keloids.
Why are the experts so wrong about the prognosis (that is the survival outlook), of the person with sickle-cell disease (Ache/Ache)?
He altered its genes (chemical instructions that, influence how certain characteristics develop) so the rodent would carry human sickle-cell disease. This blood disorder, which often leads to severe pain, anemia, and organ defects, afflicts more than 70,000 Americans.
London, June 26 (ANI): King Tutankhamun's death was a result of sickle-cell disease, and not malaria - according to experts.
Roughly one-third of adults with sickle-cell disease develop increased blood pressure in the lungs.
A protein found on red blood cells in sickle-cell disease binds these cells to blood vessel walls, disrupting circulation, a new study suggests.
Stem cell transplants have long been a therapy option for children with life-threatening cases of sickle-cell disease, but the procedure itself can be deadly.