sickle

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Related to sickled: sickle cell, sicklied

sickle

an implement for cutting grass, corn, etc., having a curved blade and a short handle

Sickle

 

a hand implement consisting of a long, curved, slightly serrated blade and used for cutting grain. Sickles first appeared in the Neolithic and were initially used to cut wild plants. They were made of wood, bone, or clay and had a cutting edge consisting of small chips of flint, called microliths, set in a groove in a mounting. Sickles made entirely of flint date from the Aeneolithic. The first metal sickles, made of bronze, appeared in the Bronze Age. Iron sickles, which appeared in the early Iron Age, were initially small and slightly curved. Later the shapes of sickles changed, becoming larger and more curved. In the USSR the sickle has survived only as a tool for small private farm plots.

sickle

[′sik·əl]
(agriculture)
The cutting mechanism of a binder, reaper, or combine.
(design engineering)
A hand tool consisting of a hooked metal blade with a short handle, used for cutting grain or other agricultural products.
(textiles)
A hooked arm for guiding the thread in a spinning mule.

Sickle

[′sik·əl]
(astronomy)
A group of six stars in the constellation Leo that outline the head of the lion.
References in periodicals archive ?
Anemia occurs in persons with sickle cell disease because sickled red blood cells do not live as long as normal red blood cells.
Pain caused by plugging of blood vessels by sickled blood cells.
Pain caused by the blockage of sickled red blood is the most common symptom of sickle cell anemia, and it can occur unpredictably in any organ or joint of the body--wherever and whenever a blood dot develops.
Anemia occurs because sickled red blood cells last only 10 to 20 days in the bloodstream, rather than the normal 120-day life time.
The sickled blood cells can't roll through small vessels as easily as normal, lozenge-shaped red blood cells can.
What I'm hoping is that if nitric oxide makes sickle-cell hemoglobin hang on to oxygen more tightly, it will also reduce the number of sickled red blood cells," Head says.
Sickled cells carry less oxygen than HbA and tend to pack together in small blood vessels.
Edelstein, who documents the finger-cutting practice in The Sickled Cell (1986, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Mass.