sickle

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sickle

an implement for cutting grass, corn, etc., having a curved blade and a short handle

Sickle

 

a hand implement consisting of a long, curved, slightly serrated blade and used for cutting grain. Sickles first appeared in the Neolithic and were initially used to cut wild plants. They were made of wood, bone, or clay and had a cutting edge consisting of small chips of flint, called microliths, set in a groove in a mounting. Sickles made entirely of flint date from the Aeneolithic. The first metal sickles, made of bronze, appeared in the Bronze Age. Iron sickles, which appeared in the early Iron Age, were initially small and slightly curved. Later the shapes of sickles changed, becoming larger and more curved. In the USSR the sickle has survived only as a tool for small private farm plots.

sickle

[′sik·əl]
(agriculture)
The cutting mechanism of a binder, reaper, or combine.
(design engineering)
A hand tool consisting of a hooked metal blade with a short handle, used for cutting grain or other agricultural products.
(textiles)
A hooked arm for guiding the thread in a spinning mule.

Sickle

[′sik·əl]
(astronomy)
A group of six stars in the constellation Leo that outline the head of the lion.
References in periodicals archive ?
A study of sickling of young erythrocytes in sickle cell anemia.
Furthermore, histopathology examination of placenta in SCD/SCT pregnancies revealed sickling in the intervillous space and decidual vessels suggesting hypoxia at maternal and foetal blood interface.
All the false negatives with the sickling test were cases of AS (carriers), not SS.
Urgent fluid replacement, plus oxygen to reverse the sickling could have averted the disaster, but the patient was under a general anaesthetic and nobody knew there was anything wrong until he woke up
Oxygen therapy, although of controversial benefit in sickle cell crisis, is given to prevent further hypoxia-induced sickling and to supplement the compromised oxygen-carrying capacity of the red blood cells (Huff, 1989; Ranney, 1992).
This type of hemoglobin does not seem to cause sickling as readily.
8] On reviewing the international data in various standard textbook publications and various population based surveys, it is found that sickling positive rate among various tribal populations is somewhere between 20 % to 30 % out of which 1 % to 2.
Nitric oxide may limit the sickling of blood cells, prevent cells from sticking to vessel walls, or dilate peripheral blood vessels, says Mark T.
Arterial oxygen pressures below 40 mmHg are likely to result in sickling in persons who have sickle cell an mia.
Sickling is caused by extensive polymerization and gelation of hemoglobin-S after deoxygenation.
What parents need to know is that there is always a precipitating cause of this "sickle cell crisis" (red cells sickling within the body).
The animals' own globins, however, prevented the resulting blood cells from sickling.