side reaction

side reaction

[′sīd rē‚ak·shən]
(chemistry)
A secondary or subsidiary reaction that takes place simultaneously with the reaction of primary interest.
References in periodicals archive ?
He chooses the elements zinc and iodine as themes for experiments regarding such matters as from a mixture to an element, synthesizing a compound from its elements: qualitative and quantitative experiments, investigating a side reaction, the ideal gas law, introducing equilibrium stoichiometry, and electrochemistry.
The existence of side reaction is a crucial factor which is leading whole-cell catalyzed and low-efficiency N-Acetyl-D-neuraminic acid production.
The conventional Karenz AOI(TM) has become an essential material for electronics manufacturers, being used as resisting material for microfabrication in production of LCDs and semiconductors due to its low side reaction and high-performance photo-curing.
The FuelCell Energy technology efficiently separates and concentrates CO2 as a side reaction during the power generation process.
Indeed, the side reaction overpotential remains positive, however it is conservative.
"It looks like an accidental side reaction, but we don't really know, because manganese oxides are very reactive and could therefore provide some indirect benefits to the organism," Hansel says.
FuelCell Energy's carbonate fuel cell technology separates and concentrates CO2 as a side reaction during the power generation process.
In order to inhibit the occurrence of side reaction, carbon dioxide was taken as carrier gas to improve the selectivity to acrylic acid.
yielding a side reaction which might explain the lack of rapidity with the overall polymerization as compared to the maleimide-based three-component photoinitiators.
In addition to the generally accepted products of this reaction, recent work suggests that another side reaction may be occurring.
Side reaction is the predominant cause of degradation for lithium ion batteries, which has been widely accepted in recent years.
Therefore, high CH4 conversion coupled with high coking rate revealed that the methane decomposition side reaction (Eq: 1) was the major source of carbon deposition over un-promoted catalyst.