side-step maneuver

side-step maneuver

A visual maneuver accomplished by a pilot at the completion of an instrument approach to permit a straight-in landing on a parallel runway that is separated by 1200 ft or less. Aircraft that will execute a side-step maneuver will be cleared for a specified approach and landing on the adjacent parallel runway. For example, “Cleared ILS (instrument landing system) runway 05 right approach, side step to land runway 05 left.” Pilots are expected to commence the maneuver as soon as possible after the runway, or runway environment, is in sight.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Plus, two runways are involved and it is not a side-step maneuver. Finally, there is a relatively long visual segment that uses lead-in lights.
The author, Tom Turner, identifies a host of "goals" to be achieved during "the first 60 seconds of a go-around," including executing a side-step maneuver and trimming for your aircraft's weight-specific [V.sub.x].
AIM 5-4-18 says: "Pilots are expected to commence the side-step maneuver as soon as possible after the runway or runway environment is in sight".
The side-step maneuver is an outlier of IFR flying that we read about but rarely get the opportunity to execute.
This is exactly what we're planning with the side-step maneuver.
Speaking of minimums, when cleared for a side-step maneuver as part of our approach, we need to pay attention to the approach minimums--particularly visibility--for the side-step maneuver.
You may never get the opportunity to conduct a side-step maneuver, but if you ever notice that your destination airport has closely space parallel runways, check the minimums section for "side-step" numbers--you may soon be hearing that phrase from ATC.