sieve elements

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Related to sieve element: sieve plate, sieve tube

sieve elements

[′siv ‚el·ə·məns]
(botany)
The food-conducting cells of phloem tissue; may be either sieve cells (in seedless vascular plants and gymnosperms) or sieve-tube members (in angiosperms).
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The time that/4, glycines spent in the first sieve element phase, the number of xylem phases and sieve element phases, and duration of xylem phases did not differ among the genotypes.
Aphids fed on 'Dowling' had the shortest duration of sieve element phases (Fig.
There were no differences In the time that aphids took to reach the sieve element phase among the soybean genotypes.
Aside from the total time of penetration in the sieve elements with saliva secretion (E1) and sap ingestion (E2), the xylem elements (G) were the central interest in this study.
Tjallingii (1990) suggested that the E1e waveform might represent the watery salivation activity that normally occurs during E1 in sieve elements. Huang et al.
When the bodies are formed, the sieve element is still an immature but complete cell containing a nucleus and other organelles and having a vacuole that is delimited by a tonoplast membrane.
Fixation of images of sieve element plastids in Beta.
callose: a carbohydrate found as a common cell wall constituent in sieve areas of a sieve element.
Sieve elements. These cells are 402 (300-460) [micron]m long, 30 to 50 [micron]m wide, and 4 to 12 [micron]m wall thickness.
Sieve elements. Cells 402 (320-460) [micron]m long, 32 to 55 [micron]m wide, and 4 to 6 [micron]m wall thickness.
An ontogenetic study of phloem in Saruma, comparing differentiating and mature sieve elements (Fig.
In the one sample, and in other Dioscorea species investigated, the plastids of anastomosal sieve elements located in the node of stems are distinguished by cuneate crystals that are much smaller than those of all other sieve elements: see figure 8.16 in Behnke (1990), taken from the same plant (then named D.