signor

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signor

, signior
an Italian man: usually used before a name as a title equivalent to Mr
References in periodicals archive ?
<<Chi di nocte chavalca, el di conviene ch'alcuna volta si riposa e dorma, cosi sper 'io che, dopo tante pene, ristor[i] 'l mie Signior mia vita e forma.
The Pacific islands also served as the locations for various transnational Utopian fictions, including the Marquis de Sade's 1795 epistolary novel Aline et Valcour (which includes a character named Leonore who is kidnapped and taken to a Pacific island), August von Kotzebue's 1799 two-act drama La Perouse (which imagines the French explorer rescued by a Native woman on a Pacific island), and Charles Brockden Brown's 1801 fragment "The Narrative of Signior Adini."
Biron in Love's Labour's Lost describes the paradoxical god as "This whimpled, whining, purblind, wayward boy,/This Signior Junior, giant dwarf, Dan Cupid" (3.1.164-165, my emphases).
together with the league for the traffike onely betweene her Majestie and the Grand Signior, with the great privileges, immunities, and favours obteyned of his Imperiall Highnesse in that behalfe, the admissions and residencies of our Ambassadours in his stately Porch, and the great good and Christian offices which her Sacred Majestie by her extraordinary favour in that Court hath done for the King and kingdom of Poland, and other Christian Princes.
Ignoring Shylock's friendly but hypocritical greeting, "Rest you fair, good signior, /Your worship was the last man in our mouths" (1.3.54-55), Antonio comes right to the point of their meeting in his initial address, Shylock, albeit I neither lend nor borrow By taking nor by giving of excess, Yet to supply the ripe wants of my friend I'll break a custom....
Now here if any man shall take exception against this our new trade with Turkes and misbeleevers, he shall shew himselfe a man of small experience in old and new Histories, or wilfully lead with partialitie, or some worse humour[...] who is ignorant that the French, the Genouois, Florentines, Reguseans, Venetians, and Polonians are at this day in league with the Grand Signior, and have beene these many yeeres, and have used trade and traffike in his dominions?
in pain of my head I must not turn my back upon him, and therefore you must not look to have a sight of him." Yet when the Grand Signior asked if a human being could play the automatic machine, the frightened Dallam, lacking fit apparel, was produced, and a comic interlude ensued.
Kirkup also gives a charming picture of his daughter's memory of Swinburne as Signior Boboli because the poet played with her in the Boboli Gardens.
Richard Cordery's RSC Polonius expanded his instructions to Reynaldo (here renamed Osric) who was told to address people "According to the phrase or the addition / Of man and country" not only as "Good sir" as in the script (2.1.46-48) but 'also as "Signior; Monsieur; Mein Herr." Another atypical reading came at the Globe when Escalus told the dukeas-friar that Angelo is "so severe, that he hath forc'd me to tell him he is indeed Justice" (3.2.253-54), with "Justice" emphatically delivered as two words, just ice.
By choosing a Turkish Grand Signior as his figure for the man of delicate taste, Burke puts maximum possible pressure on the idea that all differences, all threats to bourgeois social harmony can be reconciled by aesthetics.
When Antonio, in the same scene, makes his request for the loan, Shylock replies Signior Antonio, many a time and oft In the Rialto you have rated me About my moneys and my usances: Still have I borne it with a patient shrug, For suff'rance is the badge of all our tribe.