silica aerogel


Also found in: Dictionary, Medical.

silica aerogel

[′sil·ə·kə ′er·ə‚jel]
(materials)
A colloidal silica powder whose grains have small pores; used as a low-temperature insulator.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The Global Silica Aerogel Insulation Materials Market report focuses on global major leading industry players providing information such as company profiles, product specification, price, cost, revenue and contact information.
"Placing silica aerogel shields over sufficiently ice-rich regions of the Martian surface could therefore allow photosynthetic life to survive there with minimal subsequent intervention.
The silica aerogel provides a solid state greenhouse gas effect just like the carbon dioxide ice.
The researchers suggest that regions of the Martian surface could be made habitable with a material -- silica aerogel -- that mimics Earth's atmospheric greenhouse effect.
Parameters that have an effect on the synthesis of hydrophobic silica aerogel as well as on the properties of synthesized samples such as pH, Si /total material mass ratio, reflux time, reflux temperature, aging time, aging temperature and drying method, were investigated.
In addition to these materials, silica aerogels firstly synthesized by Kistler in 1931 have been used as additive materials in experimental studies for insulation purposes in concrete technology in recent years.
Similarly to silica aerogel, HGM have a low density, a low dielectric constant, and excellent sound and thermal insulation properties.
Enova IC3100 silica aerogel (particle size 2-40 [micro]m) was purchased from Cabot Cooperation.
Park, "Ambient pressure dried TEOS-based silica aerogels: good absorbents of organic liquids," Journal of Materials Science, vol.
YENy DELHy (CyHAN)- Indian scientists have come up with what they claim is the world's lightest material called silica aerogel or blue air, local media reported Thursday.
Deviating from the silica aerogel norm, NASA Glenn Research Center scientists conceived, designed and tested a new kind of aerogel as a basis for antenna substrates--polyimide aerogels.
Different types of solid desiccants, such as a molecular sieve, activated carbon, and silica aerogel etc, employed for humidity control have a microscopic porous structure.