silicon chloride

silicon chloride

[′sil·ə·kən ′klȯr‚īd]
(inorganic chemistry)
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Increasing the relative amount of the organic silicon chloride results in smaller crystals.
The heated silicon combines with chlorine atoms hitting it and escapes as a silicon chloride gas.
The term silicone as it is used today was coined by Professor Frederic Stanley Kipping in 1905 as part of his noteworthy and extended investigations of organosilicon compounds.(1) The name silicone described the empirical composition, [R.sub.2]SiO, of compounds obtained from the hydrolysis of disubstituted silicon chlorides, as it was believed to be similar to its carbon analog, the ketone: [R.sub.2]CO ([R.sub.2]C=0).