simony


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simony

(sĭm`ənē), in canon lawcanon law,
in the Roman Catholic Church, the body of law based on the legislation of the councils (both ecumenical and local) and the popes, as well as the bishops (for diocesan matters).
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, buying or selling of any spiritual benefit or office. The name is derived from Simon MagusSimon Magus
, Samaritan sorcerer who attempted to buy spiritual power from the apostles. From this comes the term simony. He is mentioned in the Acts of the Apostles. He was said to have founded a Gnostic sect.
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, who tried to buy the gifts of the Holy Spirit from St. Peter (Acts 8). Simony is a very grave sin, and ecclesiastics who commit it may be excommunicated. The temporal price may be one of many kinds, e.g., money or high office. What is sold may be the performance of a sacrament or any other spiritual service; it is also simony to sell a benefice or endowment or other temporality to which anything spiritual is attached. Because of the frequency of simony at times in the history of the Roman Catholic Church, the legislation of the church is very strict; e.g., simony in the election of a pope invalidates the election (law of Julius II, 1503); no priest may ask for a baptismal fee in any way; and Mass stipends are fixed by the bishop and are governed by the expense of the Mass and the necessities of the priest. Since the Council of Trent the sale of indulgences is prohibited in any form, and no blessed article may be sold as blessed. The prevalence of simony was most important in bringing about the 11th-century papal reform movement.

Simony

 

(from Simon Magus, a sorcerer who, according to evangelical mythology, asked the Apostles to sell him the gift of commanding the Holy Spirit), the buying or selling of ecclesiastical offices or holy orders, widespread in Western Europe in the Middle Ages and practiced by the papacy, kings, and important feudal lords. The abolition of simony was one of the principal demands of the advocates of the Cluniac reform, who introduced the term “simony.”

simony

Christianity the practice, now usually regarded as a sin, of buying or selling spiritual or Church benefits such as pardons, relics, etc., or preferments
References in periodicals archive ?
declared simony to be heresy, (240) and his letters (including many not
Morality A moral I've nagged, a base of rose, (I'll allay no misnomer) A harem on simony, all allies or foes: 'A bad egg--an evil aroma.
She does not mention simony, the exchange of material goods for spiritual gifts, which was a constant Lollard preoccupation often invoked in their complaints about images.
First simony (the selling of pardons or appointments) was unscriptural, then the sanctioned business of the Church, then finally unscriptural again.
Para el desarrollo de la investigacion se utilizo una tecnica naturalista, ampliamente utilizada en diferentes contextos para el conocimiento de la conducta social (Milgram, 1974; Menit y Flowler, 1948; Simony y Guiller, 1971, citados en Chacon, 1985 en Gonzalez Portal 2000), que consiste en la observacion de la conducta o de patrones conductuales de los seres humanos y aun de los animales inferiores en su habitat natural (Kotliarenco y Mendez 1988).
Thus simony most beautifully harmonizes with usury.
Its answer to the Reformation was to do better what it did best, to sweep away old abuses like simony and generally tighten up all round.
He was replaced by Toby Matthew, father of Donne's friend of the same name, who promptly paid off the Cecils in what Patrick Collinson calls "one of the more patently documented cases of simony in the Elizabethan Church.
The Hungarian Nuclear Society awarded The Karoly Simony Memorial Plaque and Prize to Professor Miklos Porkolab at its annual meeting November 29 in Budapest.
Both were convinced that two evils were now bedeviling the Latin Church: clerical marriage and simony.
23), a word that not only suggests Lady Mede's privileged access to the Church through simony and bribery, but also her sexual availability.