sine curve


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sine curve

[′sīn ‚kərv]
(mathematics)
The graph of y =sin x, where x and y are Cartesian coordinates. Also known as sinusoid.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Since we have simplified the model, it is easy to determine the whole sine curve by using only 4 data points.
Kinetic energy of the cantilevers can be calculated assuming that it is a portion of the sine curve or as an absolutely rigid straight line: outcome within the set accuracy is the same.
In this case, the appropriate polynomial approximation can be individually and nicely fitted to each sine curve segment.
For the period from the maximum to the transition point, the sine curve used is sometimes treated as a the second quadrant of the same sine curve used for the period up to the maximum (Parton and Logan 1981; Goudriaan and van Laar 1994), although others have preferred a separate sine curve with a different phase length for this section (Cesaraccio et al.
3 are sine curves or sinusoidal oscillations which are presented in polar coordinates for a centre each.
The upward movement in the third area is a quarter of a sine curve corresponds to an interval marked as [[PHI].sub.2] and enables the transition from positive to negative acceleration.
In addition, the data revealed that the few users who reached this maximum speed did so only on the straight portion of the sine curve and mostly when the virtual fixtures provided higher levels of guidance.
Using this method, from 1 h after sunrise until sundown, hourly temperature follows a sine curve (Fig.
During this time, supply operations usually underwent a steep ramp-up phase, which extracts a tremendous amount of effort from the crew to climb back to the top of the readiness sine curve.
The high points of the sine curve rotor are always in contact with, or in close proximity to, the liners and scraper gate, assuring low slip and a powerful suction lift.
Toward this end, the spurs emanating from a multiple-bit DRFM that approximates a sine curve in an ideal "least-squares" sense are analyzed.
When VFDs are used in electric induction motors, power is no Ionger provided in a balanced, three-phase sine curve, but in controlled pulses (Figure 4), referred to as square-wave or sixstep voltage.