sinistral fault

sinistral fault

[′sin·əs·trəl ′fȯlt]
(geology)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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(a) Photomicrograph of the sinistral fault in Figure 3 shows consistent sinistral sense of motion.
Along the central part of the Okoy River gorge, these are E-W to WNW-ESE-striking (096[degrees]/62[degrees]-S) sinistral faults with slickenlines typically pitching <15[degrees] and which run subparallel to the trace of the main Puhagan Fault Zone.
The sinistral faults along the downstream part of Okoy River are associated with smaller NE-SW- to E-W-striking sinistral fractures based on millimeter-scale offsets, interpreted to be synthetic Riedel shears that are completely cemented and mineralised.
8) is rotated counterclockwise relative to the rest of the peninsula, consistent with the presence of a sinistral fault along Northwest Arm (see below).
(2008) and White and Goodwin (2011) These are parallel to a well developed family of sinistral faults on the Nova Scotia Eastern Shore (Fig.
Both these domains are now separated from each other by a major post-Variscan sinistral fault system DCTZ.
In the study area, the Vienna Fault Zone coincides with the Pieniny Klippen Belt (PKB) as a sinistral fault zone that forms the border between the Inner Western Carpathians and the stable North European Platform (Ratschbacher et al., 1993; Hok et al., 2000; Lenhardt et al., 2007).
However, at the contact between this deformed sedimentary unit and the adjacent lava flow, well developed NNE-striking brittle sinistral fault planes plastered with calcite slickenfibers can be observed (Fig.
Within 50 to 150 m west of the Black Cape Fault, a dense network of brittle sinistral fault planes striking roughly NE and plastered with calcite slickenfibers (Fig.
The eastern Gaspe structures are dextral faults striking NW to NNW, but the southern Gaspe structures discussed herein are sinistral faults striking NE (Figs.
In the eastern side of KTJ: however, the collision deformation is largely accommodated within the Eastern Anatolian Block through distributed NWSE trending dextral faults and NE-SW trending sinistral faults representing escape tectonics, and shortening of the continental lithosphere along the Caucasus thrust zone.
However, late Miocene to present convergence between Nubia and Iberia (Dewey et al., 1989; McClusky et al., 2003; Serpelloni et al., 2007) has resulted in tectonic inversion of the extensional basins and development of folds, reverse and strike-slip fault systems including dextral and sinistral faults (Weijermars et al., 1985; Montenat and Ott d'Estevou, 1990; Comas et al., 1999; Booth-Rea et al., 2004).