sinus

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sinus,

cavity or hollow space in the body, usually filled with air or blood. In humans the paranasal sinuses, mucus-lined cavities in the bones of the face, are connected by passageways to the nose and probably help to warm and moisten inhaled air. When drainage from them is blocked, as after a cold, these sinuses often become infected, a condition called sinusitis. The accumulation of pus results in pressure, headaches, pain, and general discomfort. In invertebrates one of the spaces among the muscles and viscera through which blood returns to the heart is also known as a sinus.

sinus

(sÿ -nŭs) A semienclosed break along the borders of a lunar mare or in a scarp. The word is used in the approved name of such a feature on the Moon. (Latin: bay)

Sinus

 

in anatomy, a cavity, protrusion, or long closed channel. In vertebrates (including man), the term “sinus” refers to a channel filled with venous blood in the dura mater. The cavity in some cranial bones is also called a sinus. [23–1297–]

sinus

[′sī·nəs]
(biology)
A cavity, recess, or depression in an organ, tissue, or other part of an animal body.

sinus

1. Anatomy
a. any bodily cavity or hollow space
b. a large channel for venous blood, esp between the brain and the skull
c. any of the air cavities in the cranial bones
2. Pathol a passage leading to a cavity containing pus
3. Botany a small rounded notch between two lobes of a leaf, petal, etc.
4. an irregularly shaped cavity
References in periodicals archive ?
Partitioned Shape- A ridge of bone standing from the vertical part of facial nerve to the promontory area is present separating the sinus tympani into two portions: Superior and inferior.
Restricted Shape- When a high jugular bulb is present thus reducing the inferior extension of the sinus tympani.
On the Radiological Basis, Sinus Tympani can be Classified into Three Types
In these cases, sinus tympani is small and do not present a medial and posterior extension to the facial nerve.
Type B- Deep sinus tympani: The medial boundary of the sinus tympani lies medially with respect to the vertical portion of the facial nerve and do not present a posterior extension to the facial nerve.
The other posterior tympanic spaces are: Posterior tympanic sinus which is present superiorly to sinus tympani, Facial recess which is present to vertical part of facial nerve and medial to chorda tympani nerve, Lateral tympanic sinus which is present inferior to facial recess.
4) Our results indicate that it is not possible to obtain a clear view into the sinus tympani with either CWDM or ICWM via a facial recess approach unless an angled otoendoscope is used (figure 4).
Clinical data have shown that when otoendoscopes have been used as an adjunct to ICWM or CWDM for cholesteatoma, the sinus tympani was the most common site of intraoperative residuum (cholesteatoma found with the endoscope after microscopic dissection was complete).
In summary, with adjunctive otoendoscopy, it is not necessary to remove the posterior canal wall to adequately visualize the lateral epitympanum, posterior crus of the stapes, sinus tympani, eustachian tube orifice, and round window niche.
Endoscopes can be used for both primary and second-look procedures to facilitate visibility into the sinus tympani and attic.