skew


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Related to skew: skewer, askew

skew

1. Machinery having a component that is at an angle to the main axis of an assembly or is in some other way asymmetrical
2. Maths
a. composed of or being elements that are neither parallel nor intersecting as, for example, two lines not lying in the same plane in a three-dimensional space
b. (of a curve) not lying in a plane
3. Psychol the system of relationships in a family in which one parent is extremely dominating while the other parent tends to be meekly compliant
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

skew

see MEASURES OF DISPERSION.
Collins Dictionary of Sociology, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2000

skew

[skyü]
(computer science)
In character recognition, a condition arising at the read station whereby a character or a line of characters appears in a “twisted” manner in relation to a real or imaginary horizontal baseline.
(electronics)
The deviation of a received facsimile frame from rectangularity due to lack of synchronism between scanner and recorder; expressed numerically as the tangent of the angle of this deviation.
The degree of nonsynchronism of supposedly parallel bits when bit-coded characters are read from magnetic tape.
(mechanical engineering)
Gearing whose shafts are neither interesecting nor parallel.
(science and technology)
Deviating from rectangularity or a straight line.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

kneeler, kneestone, skew

kneeler, 1: K
1. A building stone which is sloped on top and flat on the bottom, as the stone that supports inclined coping on the slope of a gable. Also see footstone; gable springer.
2. The stone that breaks the horizontal-vertical unit-and-joint pattern of a normal masonry wall to begin the curve or angle of an arch or vault.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

skew

(1) The misalignment of a document or punch card in the feed tray or hopper that prohibits it from being scanned or read properly.

(2) In facsimile, the difference in rectangularity between the received and transmitted page.

(3) In communications, a change of timing or phases in a transmission signal.

(4) See cylinder skew and head skew.
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References in periodicals archive ?
This experiment showed that with PTSH, the runtime of each application decreased clearly, and data locality was stable when data skew occurred.
These are not the only algorithms that require skew free image as input in order to obtain accurate results.
Once the parameters have been determined, the relative C/N as a function of skew angle is entered in the Network Management System (NMS) for the antenna.
(ii) Based on the observation of the skew-voltage experiment, we introduce a novel voltage-aware time synchronization scheme for autonomously skew estimation, which substantially improves the clock accuracy and reduces the energy consumption.
Illustrated in FIGURE 4, this one warrants serious consideration as one of the essentially free options for mitigating glass-weave skew.
Numbers in brackets indicate U versus C skew values.
[14] Byung-Il Kown, Byung-taek Kim, Cha-Seung Jun, Seung-Chan Park, "Analysis of axially non-uniform loss distribution in 3-phase induction motor considering skew effect", IEEE Trans.
Based on scientific studies on skewed patterns there were at least 78 NAs where unusual patterns indicated rigging.
"Online consumer ratings of health care providers are highly left skewed, fall within narrow ranges, and differ by specialty, which precludes meaningful interpretation by health care consumers," the authors write.
Our goal is to extract the skewed source signal which has the maximal absolute value of skewness from the M accessible mixtures.
Reality shows skewed toward females, younger searchers (18-34) and lower income (less than $50k).