skid


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skid

1. Chiefly US and Canadian one of the logs forming a skidway
2. a support on which heavy objects may be stored and moved short distances by sliding
3. a shoe or drag used to apply pressure to the metal rim of a wheel to act as a brake

Skid

 

the locking of the wheels of a vehicle—for example, a motor vehicle, a streetcar, or railroad rolling stock—while the vehicle is in motion. As a result of such locking, the wheels slide over the bearing surface rather than turn.

A skid occurs when the braking force exceeds the force of adhesion between the wheels and the surface of a road or track, for example, in the presence of glaze ice or after rain. Skidding increases the braking distance and may cause traffic accidents. As a rule, the skidding of the rear wheels of a motor vehicle results in sideslip of the rear axle.

To avoid skids, modern motor vehicles may be equipped with automatic devices that prevent the wheels from locking.

skid

[skid]
(aerospace engineering)
The metal bar or runner used as part of the landing gear of helicopters and planes.
(engineering)
A device attached to a chain and placed under a wheel to prevent its turning when descending a steep hill.
A timber, bar, rail, or log placed under a heavy object when it is being moved over bare ground.
A wood or metal platform support on wheels, legs, or runners used for handling and moving material. Also known as skid platform.
(mechanical engineering)
A brake for a power machine.
(mining engineering)
An arrangement upon which certain coal-cutting machines travel along the working faces.

skid

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skid
skidclick for a larger image
i. An uncoordinated turn in which the airplane moves inside the turn because of an insufficient aileron or excessive rudder.
ii. In helicopters, a fixed tubular landing gear, often provided with small auxiliary wheels to provide ground mobility.
iii. A rigid ski-shaped member projecting ahead of the landing gear to prevent them from nosing over.
iv. A support for the tail-wheel on the ground in airplanes of early years.
v. A member mounted at the bottom of the aft end of the fuselage of an aircraft with a tricycle undercarriage. The skid absorbs the shock and prevents damage to the aircraft structure if the skid touches the ground either on the takeoff or the landing.
References in periodicals archive ?
To successfully raise the boom without starting the skid steer, you will need to go from a pipe thread to a hydraulic thread on the same hose.
If you know the soil conditions are going to be dicey, rent a skid steer with tracks; tracked machines are much less likely to get stuck.
"Most skids are caused by excessive driver behaviour such as coarse steering, harsh braking or acceleration, or going too fast for the circumstances," said Bill, an off-road and skid instructor at Knockhill Racing Circuit, Fife, for the past 15 years.
The state-of-the-art operator's compartment on the new R Series skid loaders leaves little to be desired.
Then skid trails and cable lines were designed on maps with regard to these observations and also skid borders.
"There is an industry trend to leverage process skids for quicker line and plant expansion to help reduce time-to-market," Wright said.
Much of the skid steer safety manuals' text has been rewritten and the graphics have been updated to be more inclusive of all styles of skid steer loaders.
ALDERLEY FZE, a subsidiary of Alderley, announce that it has successfully secured the company's largest metering order to date having won a contract to provide 22 gas and liquid metering skids for the KOC Telemetry Project in Kuwait.
When stacking GMLAs or RPs, the alignment holes in the shock isolator (rubber) skids of an upper container must be properly aligned with the stacking pins of a lower container.