care

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CARE

(Cooperative for Assistance and Relief Everywhere), nonprofit, nonsectarian federation of agencies devoted to channeling relief and self-help materials to needy people in foreign countries. Organized in the United States (1945) to help war-ravaged Europe, CARE soon expanded its program to include developing nations in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Famous for its "CARE packages" of food and other necessities, CARE in now also involved in population, health care, land management, and small economic activity. It is now an international organization with 10 member countries and headquarters in Brussels.

care

  1. the work involved in supporting people who, because of physical frailty chronic illness or other forms of incapacity and disability, are incapable of leading an autonomous existence.
  2. other kinds of carework, e.g. in child-rearing (see CHILD CARE) and DOMESTIC LABOUR. This should be distinguished from care in sense 1.
Care in sense 1 operates over a wide range of social relations. A clear dividing line can be drawn between formal and informal care (see Abrams, 1978) as it exists in contemporary industrial societies. Formal care refers to services provided by agents of organization (statutory, voluntary and/or private) to people within clearly defined categories of need. Informal care is personally directed towards certain people who have a social relationship with their carer - usually a family member, and most often a spouse (Parker, 1993), or female relative.

Feminist sociologists (see also FEMINISM) have had a major impact on the understanding of care and caring relationships. They have argued that caring is ‘a gendered concept’ and that women constitute the majority of carers both informally, in the private sphere, and as low-paid care workers (‘care assistants’) in the formal sector (Finch and Groves, 1982; Ungerson, 1987; Lewis and Meredith, 1988). Studies of caring have examined the complex reasons why women care and the particular problems and difficulties they face. Social policies involving decarceration and COMMUNITY CARE, the decline of neighbour-hood and COMMUNITY associated with increasing SOCIAL (and geographical) MOBILITY, have placed an increasing burden on individual women carers. There is some evidence that women are reluctant to enter caring relationships with female relatives but lack viable alternatives (Cotterill, 1994). Recent research using data from the 1980 British General Household Survey has also pointed to the significant contribution made by male carers, particularly men who care for their wives (Arber and Gilbert, 1989).

care, custody, and control

Describes a standard exclusion in liability insurance policies. Under this exclusion, the liability insurance does not apply to damage to property in the care or custody of the insured, or to damage to property over which the insured is for any purpose exercising physical control.

CARE

agency devoted to channeling relief to needy people abroad. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 456]

care

in (or into) care Social welfare made the legal responsibility of a local authority by order of a court
References in periodicals archive ?
Congress also should require hospitals to warn Medicare patients that staying in the hospital in observation status could affect their skilled nursing care bills, Miller said.
This article focuses on skilled nursing care, home health care, and hospice care provisions in employer-provided health care plans.
The rate reduction is invalid because it will effectively dictate that skilled nursing care is being covered and reimbursed under Medi-Cal in a manner that is not in the best interests of patients.
We keep that continuity of care and we search out for additional possibilities of skilled nursing care.
The closest parallel in the United States is probably the PACE (Program of All-inclusive Care for the Elderly) Medicaid waiver program that allows for the delivery of skilled nursing care in community settings.
Kim responds, "Mom, your Medicare covers only skilled nursing care costs under very specific conditions or an extremely limited time period.
Those in independent living facilities, for example, pay 47 percent of their monthly income up to $1,200 while those requiring skilled nursing care pay 70 percent of their monthly income up to $2,500.
Scheduled to begin its first course this month, the Seniors Housing & Care Program will offer at least four 4-day seminars throughout the year addressing the entire long-term care continuum, from independent living to skilled nursing care.
Boulevard is a strategic alliance of three professionals from the fields of acute care, skilled nursing care, and real estate: Fred Benjamin, who will serve as corporate president; Brian Cloch, who is president and CEO of QualityCare Management, which will manage the facility; and Jeffrey Elowe, president of Elkor Realty.
subsidiaries operate skilled nursing and assisted living facilities as well as a rehabilitation therapy and a hospice business, which focus on creating a culture that attracts and retains an innovative, caring and ethical team that provides high-quality care to patients, and has a strong reputation for treating patients who require a high level of skilled nursing care and extensive rehabilitation therapy.
That gives us the opportunity to admit people who do not have the diagnosis of Alzheimer's who also need skilled nursing care,'' Terrell said.
The Hatch/Domenici bill suggests that even the full update would be insufficient, calling for HCFA to make necessary adjustments in the SNF market basket index to better account for annual cost increases in providing skilled nursing care to medically complex patients.