skin test

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skin test

[′skin ‚test]
(immunology)
A procedure for evaluating immunity status involving the introduction of a reagent into or under the skin.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
In a randomized double-blind manner, skin-test sites on 1 arm were covered with 1 mL of placebo cream (Aqueous cream BP, Sandoz, Bordon, Hants, UK) and the skin-test sites on the contralateral arm were covered with zinc sulfate (2) dissolved in aqueous cream to a concentration of 1% elemental zinc.
Control TB skin-test areas to which placebo cream had been applied yielded significantly smaller reactions in persons with lower concentrations of plasma zinc (p = 0.03, Table).
Studies have been based on a variety of control antigen preparations and skin-test administration and methods for reading test results.
Mumps skin-test antigen has been available for a longer time; lack of response to mumps antigen in HIV-Infected persons has been associated with risk for TB (19), but some patients who have lost PPD reactivity with progression of HIV disease may still react to mumps (24).
There was a marked increase in the number and the rate of tuberculin skin-test conversions among Hospital A employees in 1990 (Figure).
Among the 38 Ward W employees who worked between June 1 and October 1, 1990, those who were working while Patient A was hospitalized had an increased risk for skin-test conversion (43% [12 of 28] vs 0% [0 of 9]; relative risk undefined; P=.02).
Medical records of zoo employees were reviewed for evidence of TB symptoms (i.e., persistent cough, hemoptysis, night sweats, difficulty in breathing, and weight loss), chest radiograph information, and tuberculin skin-test results.
Tuberculin Skin-Test Conversion Categories and Statistical Analyses
On March 6, the Tuberculosis Control Division, City and County of San Francisco Department of Public Health, conducted tuberculin skin-test screening of all 17 persons who resided in the facility on that date and 14 of 20 staff members; seven persons who had resided in the facility after November 1990, as well as six staff members, were unavailable during the initial screening.
In March 1990, MCHD personnel returned for follow-up skin testing of 70 persons who were previously skin-test negative and were still present in the facility.
The different management of penicillin allergy between allergists and non-allergists was mainly observed in patients with a history of severe non-immediate reaction and in patients with a history of an immediate reaction, particularly in the patients who have been skin-tested with penicillin reagents.