skipper


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skipper:

see butterflybutterfly,
any of a large group of insects found throughout most of the world; with the moths, they comprise the order Lepidoptera. There are about 12 families of butterflies. Most adult moths and butterflies feed on nectar sucked from flowers.
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skipper

1
1. the captain of any vessel
2. the captain of an aircraft

skipper

2
1. any small butterfly of the family Hesperiidae, having a hairy mothlike body and erratic darting flight
2. another name for the saury (a fish)
References in classic literature ?
Meanwhile the skipper had exchanged a glance with Senhor Santos, and I think we all felt that he was going to tell us the truth.
"For'ard with ye!" yelled the skipper. "The powder's underneath you in the lazarette!"
Cole, for I ain't above an oar myself; but, by God, I'm skipper o' this here ship, and I'll skip her as long as I remain aboard!"
"She'll likely be comin' down on the marnin' train," the skipper had soliloquized, and gone inside to change his clothes and wash.
"An' thus 'ull be the loddie," the skipper said, reaching out a hesitant hand to the child's cheek.
The skipper straightened up, and to conceal the pang at his heart he drew out his watch and looked at it.
Harvey, Dan, and the others stood back, winking one to the other and full of joy; but Disko and Salters wrangled seriously till evening, Salters arguing that a cattle-boat was practically a barn on blue water, and Disko insisting that, even if this were the case, decency and fisher-pride demanded that he should have kept "things sep'rate." Long Jack stood it in silence for a time, - an angry skipper makes an unhappy crew, - and then he spoke across the table after supper:
"It's plumb mortifyin' to all my feelin's," the skipper went on.
"'Why, o' course it was so," said Salters, "you bein' skipper here; an' I'd cheerful hev stopped on a hint - not from any leadin' or conviction, but fer the sake o' bearin' an example to these two blame boys of aours."
"Only losing the skipper," he added, "was the worst.
"What am I to do?" burst out the skipper. "This office closes at four o'clock.
"Upon this the fine-looking skipper gave signs of distress.