skullcap


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

skullcap

any of various perennial plants of the genus Scutellaria, esp S. galericulata, that typically have helmet-shaped flowers: family Lamiaceae (labiates)
Enlarge picture
skullcap

skullcap

Strong popular medicinal herb. Small plant, 6-18” high. Blue/lavender flowers. In mint family- hairy, square stems, opposite leaves, heartshaped at the base with scalloped edges. Seed pods at base of each leaf. Anti-inflammatory, antispasmodic. Used for mental disorders, anxiety, nervous conditions, hysteria, delirium, epilepsy, drug withdrawal, headaches, sleep problems, bacteria, viruses, hepatitis, lowers blood pressure, diuretic,. Induces menstruation, do not take if pregnant. Make sure you have the right kind, there are over 350 species and they are not all the same. Some are toxic.
References in periodicals archive ?
A commercial American skullcap product (sample A, 200 g) was first refluxed at 80[degrees]C with 70% ethanol twice and then with water twice (American skullcap/solvent: 1/30; 30min each time).
Now that skullcap will go on display at the Jewish Museum of Berlin in an effort by museum officials to respond in a more timely way to those events influencing contemporary life.
Schuster suggested three years ago that Jews should not wear skullcaps in areas with large Muslim populations.
In their society, where sexual excitement was thought to be a mental disorder, skullcap was given to reduce this condition.
He said he ordered a skullcap at a shop in Rome that made vestments for the Pope and had it shipped to Manila.
In addition, the product features an herbal blend that consists of boswellia, skullcap, hops, sea cucumber and passion flower.
The kit includes lemon balm and skullcap formula, which is taken in droplet form a few times a day.
I have a range, my warm favourite being a cashmere skullcap that I bought in Mongolia.
The third category would be stimulating/sedating herbs like cayenne, ginger, cinnamon, skullcap, and chamomile.
Medical herbalist Linda Bostock says: ``We all know what it feels like to get caught up in the pressures of day-today life with friends and family making demands, deadlines looming and bills to pay``There are a number of gentle, nonaddictive herbs that can help through times of stress, such as valerian, vervain, hops and skullcap, all of which soothe, calm and ease feelings of tension and irritability.