skyline yarding

skyline yarding

[′skī‚līn ‚yärd·iŋ]
(forestry)
A technique that uses a skyline cable system to transport logs from a forest to a clear space along a road for trucking to a sawmill; it requires fewer roads than older cable systems, suspends logs off the ground to reduce erosion, and reduces damage to young trees that are left.
References in periodicals archive ?
The equation for estimating stump-to-loaded-truck costs for the skyline yarding system consists of the same variables as the tractor system model: 1) average diameter of trees removed (range 6 to 10.5 in.); 2) volume per acre removed (range 13 to 125 green tons); and 3) average yarding distance (600, 1,200, and 1,800 ft.) (Table 3).
From a marginal standpoint, stump-to-truck costs increase approximately $1.26 per ton for every 100-foot increase in skyline yarding distance.
Variable Coefficient (t-statistic) Average diameter at breast height -1.272 (-10.14) removed (in.) Volume per acre removed (tons) -0.058 (-9.01) Average skidding distance (ft.) .0069 (17.22) Constant 28.04 (22.08) [r.sup.2] .637 Adjusted [r.sup.2] .631 Standard error as % of mean 13.4 TABLE 3 Skyline yarding cost equation.