slack water

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slack water

[′slak ′wȯd·ər]
(oceanography)
The interval when the speed of the tidal current is very weak or zero; usually refers to the period of reversal between ebb and flood currents.
References in periodicals archive ?
Headings varied across all magnetic bearings during flood and slack tides. Only ebb tides showed any consistency in flow direction; however, our sample of ebb tides was smaller than that for flood and slack tides.
As for the filefish I found in their bellies, it's easy to imagine snappers plucking these out of the weeds at slack tide. Once the tide resumes, the crabs retreat to their safe spots and life in the Bay at that spot goes on.
Caltrans plans to use the tightly choreographed sequential-charge implosion method to remove the piers E4 and E5 during the upcoming window months of October and November, during slack tide to minimize the transfer of energy and debris downstream.
Fishing at slack tide greatly facilitates this technique.
He said: "This is an extremely dangerous passage of water and it's pure chance that there were favourable weather conditions and he caught a slack tide."
Rather than transiting the Sergius Narrows only during slack tide, the fast ferry vessel will be able to operate on a set schedule.
If you have your own boat, try shark fishing off Alcatraz or Angel Island or near the shipping channels, on a slack tide. Bring gloves and pliers for removing the hooks.
Some of these channels can only be checked in slack tide due to the swift currents that flow through them.
The lifeboats and helicopter continued until slack tide at 6pm, but could not find any sign of the diver and decided to halt the search.
Sometimes slack tide is best for these big reds, other times the incoming tide is better.
Stealthily approach these spots of interest with someone on the lookout who is also an able caster, because during slack tide you can find them circling the structure on the surface.
Cobias have a well-known habit of surface-cruising during slack tide and if you can spot them they will usually oblige an accurate cast.