slave trade


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Related to slave trade: slavery

slave trade

the business of trading in slaves, esp the transportation of Black Africans to America from the 16th to 19th centuries
www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/slavery.htm
http://webworld.unesco.org/slave_quest/en
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The slave trade - and the wealth it generated - played an instrumental role in shaping the face of Liverpool as we know it.
However, among the maritime trade flowing in and out of the city was a thriving slave trade that made traders rich off the back of human suffering.
The author draws primarily on the Transatlantic Slave Trade Database for quantitative evidence.
There are also a series of comprehension question (with multiple choice answers) that will test the reader's knowledge of the story and the wider slave trade.
For most of the early modern period, Spain had remained actively involved in the transatlantic slave trade by proxy, as Portuguese, British, and French slave traders supplied captives to Spanish territories.
One of O'Malley's many surprising insights is that the mortality rate of the intercolonial slave trade may have been comparable to that of the deadly Middle Passage.
Educators promote the day by informing people about the historical events associated with slave trade, the consequences of slave trade, and to promote tolerance and human rights.
McInnis, a scholar who has studied the slave trade in Richmond, said the city should embrace the moment.
wanted to explain the role that colleges played in perpetuating slavery and the slave trade:' Wilder told Democracy Now!
The editors' objective is not to contest the importance or scale of the transatlantic slave trade, which they acknowledge dwarfs the migrations discussed in their book.
COMPARING THE INTEGRITY AND forthrightness of European politicians of old and their descendants of today, at least judging from the descendants' recent escapades in Cote d'Ivoire, Libya and other such places; where a "no-fly zone" and the "protection of civilians" become a licence for regime change, is like comparing chalk and cheese--if a recently discovered treasure trove of British official records on the Transatlantic Slave Trade, dating back to 1806, is any guide.