sleet

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sleet,

precipitation of small, partially melted grains of ice. As raindrops fall from clouds, they pass through layers of air at different temperatures. If they pass through a layer with a temperature below the freezing point, they turn into sleet. Snowflakes that have melted by passing through a warm layer will turn into sleet if they then pass through a freezing layer. Sleet often falls together with snow and rain, and may deposit an icy coating on exposed surfaces. Sleet occurs only during the winter, while hailhail,
precipitation in the form of pellets composed of ice or of ice and snow, occurring at any time of the year, usually during the passage of a cold front or during a thunderstorm. Small hailstones have a soft center and a single outer coat of ice.
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, a different form of icy precipitation, may fall at any time of the year.

sleet

[slēt]
(meteorology)
Colloquially in some parts of the United States, precipitation in the form of a mixture of snow and rain.

sleet

Water droplets falling from clouds that become clear ice pellets after passing through a layer of clouds with freezing temperatures. Sleet thus indicates a temperature inversion. Sleet may also develop from the freezing of melted snow, as the latter falls through a colder layer of air near the ground. On weather charts, sleet is represented by image

sleet

1. partly melted falling snow or hail or (esp US) partly frozen rain
2. Chiefly US the thin coat of ice that forms when sleet or rain freezes on cold surfaces
References in classic literature ?
In another harbour not far distant, a woman, who was suckling a recently-born child, came one day alongside the vessel, and remained there out of mere curiosity, whilst the sleet fell and thawed on her naked bosom, and on the skin of her naked baby
The sheep stopped in their eating and looked timidly at us; and the cattle, their heads turned from the wind and sleet, stared angrily as if they held us responsible for both annoyances; but, except these things, and the shudder of the dying day in every blade of grass, there was no break in the bleak stillness of the marshes.
Came days of fog, when even Maud's spirit drooped and there were no merry words upon her lips; days of calm, when we floated on the lonely immensity of sea, oppressed by its greatness and yet marvelling at the miracle of tiny life, for we still lived and struggled to live; days of sleet and wind and snow-squalls, when nothing could keep us warm; or days of drizzling rain, when we filled our water-breakers from the drip of the wet sail.
The sleet fell all that day unceasingly, a thick mist came on early, and it never rose or lightened for a moment.
We were again upon the melancholy road by which we had come, tearing up the miry sleet and thawing snow as if they were torn up by a waterwheel.
Saunders, captures his life's work in a book that includes more than 400 photographs and a memorable introduction by Sleets friend, superphotographer Gordon Parks, who said Sleet spoke "for those who died for worthy causes, for those born yesterday and for those who will be born tomorrow.