sleight of hand


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sleight of hand

1. manual dexterity used in performing conjuring tricks
2. the performance of such tricks
References in periodicals archive ?
In Photography is Magic (Aperture), curator and critic Charlotte Cotton uses the guiding concept of a magician's tricks (as she puts it in the introduction, "the kind of intimate, right-in-front-of-you sleight of hand that brings pure wonder and delight") to survey the art of 80 contemporary photographers.
From juggling and Diabolo to escapology and sleight of hand - it will all be there.
The cheeky villains use sleight of hand to pocket the cash before handing back empty wallets.
But for all its dazzling sleight of hand, the audience is left feeling empty-handed and cheated by the peculiar finale.
In a four-part series Ben wS ill be showing his sleight of hand tricks and in episode two, on May 3, Crosby will feature in it.
"QUOTES" "We can declare the X Factor the greatest sleight of hand, ever.
Chi Onwurah, Labour MP for Newcastle Central, accused the Government of a "sleight of hand" over bringing forward spending on the Metro - with not one extra job created as a result.
Usually a wizard at sleight of hand he conjured up a world of pain for himself when he chopped half of his finger off while - ironically - attempting to fit a safety guard on a circular saw.
The trick was performed by Russell Fitzgerald, an amateur magician known to open meetings with a little sleight of hand.
Amherst's Orange Television plays a bit of sleight of hand with the listener.
And it took some legal sleight of hand to keep the NAMA debt off Ireland's official accounts, so that we wouldn't breach EU rules against borrowing too much.