slide

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slide

1. Rowing a sliding seat in a boat or its runners
2. a thin glass plate on which specimens are mounted for microscopic study
3. a positive photograph on a transparent base, mounted in a cardboard or plastic frame or between glass plates, that can be viewed by means of a slide projector
4. Machinery
a. a sliding part or member
b. the track, guide, or channel on or in which such a part slides
5. Music
a. the sliding curved tube of a trombone that is moved in or out to allow the production of different harmonic series and a wider range of notes
b. a portamento
6. Music
a. a metal or glass tube placed over a finger held against the frets of a guitar to produce a portamento
b. the style of guitar playing using a slide
7. Geology
a. the rapid downward movement of a large mass of earth, rocks, etc., caused by erosion, faulting, etc.
b. the mass of material involved in this descent

Slide

 

in machine building, that part of a metalcutting machine tool or other machine designed to move a tool, workpiece, or subassembly of the machine in two, usually perpendicular, directions; it usually has two guide systems. Slides are classified as longitudinal, transverse, and swing types. Medium-sized machines have solid slides, and heavy machine tools use box-shaped hollow slides. SCh 15–32 cast (pig) iron is mostly used. The fixed metal beams on which machine subassemblies, such as electric motors, are moved during operation are also called slides.

slide

[slīd]
(engineering)
A sloping chute with a flat bed.
A sliding mechanism.
(geology)
A vein of clay intersecting and dislocating a vein vertically, or the vertical dislocation itself.
A rotational or planar mass movement of earth, snow, or rock resulting from failure under shear stress along one or more surfaces.
(mechanical engineering)
The main reciprocating member of a mechanical press, guided in a press frame, to which the punch or upper die is fastened.
(mining engineering)
An upright rail fixed in a shaft with corresponding grooves for steadying the cages.
A trough used to guide and to support rods in a tripod when drilling an angle hole. Also known as rod slide.
(ordnance)
Sliding part of the receiver of certain automatic weapons.
Sliding catch on the breech mechanism of certain weapons.
References in periodicals archive ?
Defenders of the Utley and Coghlan slides say, "That's how the game is played;" "Players are taught to take out the middle infielder when breaking up a double play;" "They didn't mean to injure the fielder;" and "The slide was legal because the runner hit the ground first.
Inflatable water slides should always be manufactured with enough Velcro to keep the inflatable liner in place, irregardless of the pressure the water weight will put on it.
They still use the slides to teach logarithms because they find that students retain more when they learn with slides than with calculators, Shawlee said.
Taking a dime and prying open one side of the slide can easily pop the cable insert out/in to capture the cables in the slide.
By presenting the piece in an almost entirely white room with a clear Plexiglas projector stand, Coleman stages the apparatus of projection, preventing our complete surrender to the image and generating a breach further pronounced by short, dark intervals between slides and corresponding sections of commentary.
Guided notes are modified versions of the instructor's notes or slides that require students to fill in missing information as the lecture progresses.
You do not need to have PowerPoint software to use these modules and see the slides displayed.
Slides come with a teacher manual featuring image reproductions, lessons, and student writing assignments.
The undercuts (if any) are then used to guide the construction of die slides.
In many parts of the country, more clients than ever are asking for slides This makes some builders nervous.
Although less than a decade old, DNA microarray slides have made an incredible impact on life science research.