slow burning


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slow burning

A misleading term implying a general property of a material or product when it is exposed to a fire of any size or severity; meaningful only when identified with a particular test, usually applying only to very small flames for a short time period.
References in periodicals archive ?
In his spell as opposition leader, all he had to do was wait on the sidelines, as the Conservatives lit the slow burning fuse of self-destruction.
"This effect is more pronounced with slow burning powders such as 296/H110 and are appropriate and commonly used in .357 and .44 magnum cartridges.
Proteins are recognised as a source of slow burning, sustainable energy, without the unfavourable effects associated with the consumption of high amounts of caffeine and sugar.
The five-time Olympic champion says interest in the event, just weeks away, has been slow burning, particularly in England.
Black powder is not slow burning by any stretch of the imagination.
The American post-punk icons began with the progressive slow burning Success, and then broke into the faster-paced Say Hello to the Angels with its dark electro 1980s sound.
A diversion from the Rave-bolstered, take over the world starting at the dancefloor approach that is Metric's default position, this tune, wrestled away from Charli's own album, is a slow burning medium-rare mourn-a-thon.
THIS slow burning legal thriller has more in common with the old school style of someone like Sidney Lumet, rather than the thrills and spills of a Michael Crichton adaptation.
Gazed with a love forever doomed to be secret at the well developed Veronica Plum as you trailed her home from school with a slow burning passion in your heart?
Crews were called to the scene shortly before 7.30am, although it is believed the fire may have been slow burning all night.
What has kept hybrid-rocket fuels out of shuttle designs, as well as out of any existing plans for rockets that carry heavy loads, is the fuels' slow burning rate.
The dark, shiny metal wick cores are used to make the wick more rigid and to slow burning, and are thus more common in large, poured candles (such as pillar candles and those in glass containers) and those where a longer burning time may be especially desirable (such as scented candles).