slow neutron


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Related to slow neutron: Thermal neutrons, Fast neutron

slow neutron

[′slō ′nü‚trän]
(nuclear physics)
A neutron having low kinetic energy, up to about 100 electronvolts.
(nucleonics)
References in periodicals archive ?
(1) for a slow neutron produces a proton and a triton moving in opposite directions with the same momentum since practically no momentum is transferred from the neutron.
* Very slow neutron transport at pulsed heating of cold moderator
During NPDGamma data taking, a beam chopper upstream of the apparatus eliminates frame overlap by blocking very slow neutrons from the tail of the preceding beam pulse, and also cuts off each beam pulse after 33 ms in order to permit a beam-off background measurement in the [gamma] detectors to be made as part of the normal data taking cycle.
Polarized [.sup.3]He spin filters are needed for a variety of experiments with slow neutrons. Their demonstrated utility for highly accurate determination of neutron polarization are critical to the next generation of betadecay correlation coefficient measurements.
Rapid delivery of the contents of the above-mentioned capacitances of the ECCS to the inside of the core of the nuclear reactor results in the quenching in it of a large amount of boron-containing material that absorbs fast and slow neutrons, chain nuclear reactions in the fuel assemblies, and the removal of the reactor to a minimum thermal power.
Nuclear weapons require fissile material, atoms of which can fission (split) when struck by fast or slow neutrons (4); pieces of this material can support a nuclear chain reaction.
After high energy neutrons are emitted by the source and diffuse outward through the soil, a fraction of the slow neutrons rebound back towards the probe and are absorbed by the nucleus of the gas in the detector, giving rise to a signal that, after processing, is known as the `neutron count'.
That's when spring will arrive in the region and a top layer of carbon dioxide frost will evaporate, opening a path for slow neutrons from underlying material to reach the spacecraft's detectors.
Since the bulk cross section of slow neutrons interacting with hydrogen is much larger that of deuterium, the transmission (i.e.
Plutonium 239, being fissionable with slow neutrons, can be used as a fuel in power plants, but it can also be used in nuclear weaponry.
In 1938, Otto Hahn and Fritz Strassmann used slow neutrons to effect the first experimentally induced fission of uranium.
Fermi had bombarded uranium with slow neutrons in the hope of obtaining element number 93, but the results had been confusing (see 1934).