slow-wave sleep


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Related to slow-wave sleep: deep sleep

slow-wave sleep

[′slō ¦wāv ′slēp]
(psychology)
References in periodicals archive ?
PSG-measured time spent in slow-wave sleep was improved by a mean of 34 minutes by 6 months in the CBT group, versus a loss of 23 minutes at 6 months in the zopiclone group.
Tiagabine increased slow-wave sleep (SWS) in a dose-dependent manner, with a mean SWS increase of 7.1% for placebo compared with 10.8% at 4 mg, 14.8% at 8 mg, 25.6% at 12 mg, and 28.8% at 16 mg.
Others believe REM sleep is simply the brain's way of toning itself up after switching off during slow-wave sleep.
In particular, slow-wave sleep was important for reducing the number of synapse-forming molecules in the brain.
The volunteers who had explored the virtual town displayed elevated hippocampus activity during slow-wave sleep, compared with the untrained men.
This activity reappeared more strongly during slow-wave sleep over the next 2 days.
During a sleep phase known as slow-wave sleep, unique bursts of electrical activity in the somatosensory cortex were immediately preceded by characteristic electrical discharges in the hippocampus.
Landau-Kleffner syndrome, or acquired epileptiform aphasia, has as its diagnostic hallmark electrophysiologic evidence of status epilepticus during slow-wave sleep.
In the new study, slated to appear in Nature Neuroscience, the performance-enhancing naps consisted mainly of a non-REM sleep stage known as slow-wave sleep.
A 1998 study showed that healthy persons who were subjected to deprivation of slow-wave sleep reported increased perception of pain (J.
Sleep abnormalities such as reduced slow-wave sleep and short REM latency often are reported in studies of depression, but these abnormalities are neither highly consistent nor highly specific to depression.
Rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep later in the night strengthens only memories already bolstered by slow-wave sleep, the researchers report.