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slow

1. (of trade, etc.) unproductive; slack
2. Photog requiring a relatively long time of exposure to produce a given density
3. Cricket (of a bowler, etc.) delivering the ball slowly, usually with spin
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, practicing a patter sequence on text only, then pitches, then text and pitches together, appears to be less beneficial than slowing the sequence down to a tempo at which the learner can perform both together.
Author Carl Honore heralded this growing movement of people dedicated to slowing down the pace of their lives in his 2004 book In Praise of Slow.
But he says that change may be hard, adding: 'Slowing down may mean earning less or dropping a hobby but such sacrifices are small compared to what we gain in quality of life.'
Clearly, some slowing in the pace of spending was necessary and expected if the economy was to progress along a balanced and sustainable growth path.
In many ways, this could be the mission statement of the specialty food industry, although none of our lives seem to be slowing down much.
The idea of lactate training is to improve the efficiency of your energy systems over time, allowing you to run faster without shifting into anaerobic glycolysis, lactic acid production, and slowing down due to fatigue.
The periodic slow-wave complexes arose from background activity that was essentially normal, except for some mild bifrontal dominant slowing (Figure 2).
NEW YORK-As their lives are speeding up elsewhere, consumers are slowing things down in the kitchen.
The Southeast Asian crisis is primarily responsible for slowing worldwide economic growth from 4 percent in 1997 to 2 percent in 1998.
Study participants experienced a slowing in loss of ability to perform activities of daily living and in disruptive social behavior, although no measurable difference was noted in subjects' overall impairment.
Miller and all authorities stress that "just slowing down can do wonders to improve how well you speak and how easily you are understood by others.
Researchers have predicted numerous benefits of inducing torpor in people--for example, preventing further damage after a stroke or heart attack by slowing the body's often-harmful response, or putting a patient into a metabolically suspended state while he or she awaits a vital-organ transplant.