smack


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smack

1. a sailing vessel, usually sloop-rigged, used in coasting and fishing along the British coast
2. a fishing vessel equipped with a well for keeping the catch alive
References in periodicals archive ?
You would not smack an adult or even a teenager, smacking should never be used, and parents who do need to be educated on other effective discipline methods, usually involving routines and boundaries that all parents/guardians stick to.
So-called experts tell us, "research shows" that any smack is harmful to a child's mental health.
I can understand that times are a lot different now and some of the stories about abusive parents that you read about in the news are horrendous, so in a way I can understand why you cannot smack your children anymore.
He said Australia's smacking legislation gives parents the right to give a slight smack to children but never on the head.
I'm one of the people who thinks we do need to smack children, or use corporal punishment, for good reasons.
But the 2004 Children's Act states that, if a smack results in bruising, swelling, cuts or grazes, it is punishable with up to five years in jail.
"These parents are scared to smack their children and paranoid that social workers will get involved and take their children away."
In response to these behaviors, many of the day-old macaques smacked their lips after seeing a mouth opening and closing, but they didn't copy what they had seen.
And the law was too often used as a legal defence to excuse violent behaviour that went far beyond a smack.
Married parents are twice as likely as single parents to smack their children while half of all mothers and fathers say they feel guilty after hitting their child.
But yesterday the child law expert admitted in a newspaper interview that she had in the past delivered "a wee smack" to her daughter and two sons.