smack


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smack

1. a sailing vessel, usually sloop-rigged, used in coasting and fishing along the British coast
2. a fishing vessel equipped with a well for keeping the catch alive
References in periodicals archive ?
Smack manufactures its Southern California inspired apparel in its headquarters, only five miles from the home of beach volleyball.
The appellate court also agreed with the district court that the use of irreverent phrases on Smack Apparel's shirts was a misuse of university's goodwill in its trademarks.
I can understand the primitive feeling of wanting to smack as any other mum can, when the two lovelies become two monsters, but have found it thankfully fairly easy to resist.
They do not perceive a smack from a loving parent as the outrage of assault, but as unwelcome discomfort, and to be happy and secure they need a boundary that they are unwilling to cross.
The Bachelor" Sean Lowe loves his new Smack shorts (Photo: Business Wire)
But there is a difference between a smack across the legs and assault.
The Christian Institute, based in Newcastle, has defended parents who occasionally use a smack to correct their child's bad behaviour.
It follows a survey which shows 77 per cent of people in the West Midlands think it is becoming less acceptable to smack a child, with 42 per cent wanting to shop in a smack-free shop.
A smack lets a child know bad behaviour cannot be tolerated.
Parents will face prosecution if they smack their child hard enough to leave a mark or cause mental harm.
Under my amendment, parents will still be able to smack their children if they don't harm them physically or mentally.