smack


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smack

1. a sailing vessel, usually sloop-rigged, used in coasting and fishing along the British coast
2. a fishing vessel equipped with a well for keeping the catch alive
References in periodicals archive ?
Looking back I feel that a smack on the bum when I was being exceptionally deserving of one did not do me any harm.
Studies from various institutions have shown that smacking is usually an ineffective form of behaviour correction, that parents who smack their children are far more likely to resort to harsher forms of punishment, and that smacking may cause children to suffer from developmental difficulties.
Current legislation, enforced under The Children Act of 2004, says parents are allowed to smack their offspring without causing the "reddening of the skin".
At issue in the litigation were six shirts that Smack Apparel manufactured that referred to the universities' athletic accomplishments, specifically LSU and Oklahoma University's participation in the 2004 Sugar Bowl as well as the number of championships previously won by Ohio State University and the University of Southern California.
And the law was too often used as a legal defence to excuse violent behaviour that went far beyond a smack.
And Labour's Pauline O'Neill, convenor of the Holyrood justice committee, said: "People are not bad parents because they smack their kids over the back of their hands.
I've observed that it is parents who don't smack whose children smack them.
Smack Sportswear (OTCBB: SMAK), the leading brand of custom team and beach active apparel, today announced a partnership with ABC's hit primetime reality series, The Bachelor.
Jill Kirby, former Director of the Centre for Policy Studies, recently said, "there is no connection or similarity between a smack by a loving parent and violent abuse".
Giving a child a smack doesn't mean he or she is abused.
WE asked: Should parents be allowed to smack their children?