smart dust


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smart dust

Miniaturized sensor/transmitters that are sprinkled onto an area such as a battlefield and used to analyze the environment. Developed by Professor Kris Pister at the University of California at Berkeley and expected in the next decade, smart dust particles are planned to be no more than 1 cubic millimeter in size, which includes a solar cell, a sensor, CPU, memory and radio transmitter. See mote and smart skin.
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This Note will attempt to argue that while smart dust has myriad social, governmental, and scientific benefits, it is just another barrier to the fundamental liberties and protections of American citizens who roam within the public sphere.
Mica 2 motes represent the third-generation mote module of the "Smart Dust" wireless network developed by Crossbow.
Use of smart dust as a nanotaggant may, as an example, serve as a means of removing anonymity of those working with precursor elements of biological weapons.
As suggested in the introduction, wireless sensors or smart dust motes can be used in such monitoring applications in addition to the wide range of other smart dust potential applications [8].
The new method lays this specialized surface on top of the sample in the form of a "smart dust" of gold nanoparticles coated with a thin shell of silica or alumina.
The craft, which is called "smart dust", is modelled on the dust particles that orbit the sun and are propelled by the photons streaming out from the sun.
Research in the field of wireless sensor networks (also called smart dust) was started as a research project in 1997 by University of California computer science professor Kris Pister.
These devices are also called smart dust motes, implying small size and "smartness" distinguishing them from mere sensing devices.
The Transport Operations Research Group (Torg) at Newcastle University has developed "smart dust" technology which involves using tiny wireless sensors.
Using "SMART dust" the sensors have been designed to fit on cars and buses, or even to be carried by cyclists and pedestrians.
People are even thinking of long-term visions such as smart dust or smart pebbles which can be used in concrete or asphalt, creating a kind of built-in SHM.