smartweed


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smartweed:

see buckwheatbuckwheat,
common name for certain members of the Polygonaceae, a family of herbs and shrubs found chiefly in north temperate areas and having a characteristic pungent juice containing oxalic acid. Species native to the United States are most common in the West.
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smartweed

smartweed

Red-stemmed plant with pointy leaves and thin cone or light colored greenish or pink flowers at top of stem. Leaf tea used for internal bleeding, menstruation, uterus problems, blood in urine. Leaves contain Rutin, which strengthens capillaries. Pain reliever. Hot peppery pungent taste. Contains oils that may irritate skin. Grows in moist areas. SMARTWEED MARSHPEPPER (Polygonum hydropiper) Very hot, peppery, spicy. Leaves or stems can be eaten raw or cooked. Seeds can be used as pepper substitute. Astringent, bleeding, diarrhea, hemorrhoids, strengthens capillaries, anti-inflammatory. Thin pointy edible leaves, cluster of pink flowers on vertical stem.
References in periodicals archive ?
Smartweed, when planted by itself, can tolerate some frost and benefit from an earlier drawdown to help with weed control.
Smartweed (also known as knotweed) is the common name given to a whole genus of plants, Polygonum, which translates as "many knees." Many members of this genus are, in fact, garden-worthy plants.
(late boneset), Persicaria punctata (Ell.) Small (smartweed), Salix nigra Marsh.
In 1998, Nuevo San Juan received the green certification by the Smartweed World Forest Council.
I pictured where he had probably tied her up and done it, out behind the barn where the smartweed and buttonweed took over in high summertime, where on hot afternoons you could count on a large angular shape of cool shade, where I had once come across my father jerking off, facing the old cement silo, his back partly turned.
503), including the complex terminological issue of the dual pronunciations of the graph [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], which pronounced tu meant sowthistle or smartweed, and in the pronunciation cha meant tea.
Response of aquatic macroinvertebrates to early-spring drawdown in nodding smartweed marshes.
Whole plant extracts of curled pondweed (Potamogeton crispus L.), European cutgrass (Leersia japonica Makino), and smartweed (Polygonum hydropiper L.) decreased mutagenic effects of BaP, 2-nitrofluorene, and 2-aminofluorene (Fujimoto et al., 1987): Water extract of grass wrack pondweed (Potamogeton oxyphyllus Miquel) also reduced reverse mutations induced by BaP, AF-2, and 2-nitrofluorene in S.
The complex of indigenous domesticates includes a variety of nutritious seed plants such as pigweed (Amaranthus), lamb's quarter or goosefoot (Chenopodium), knotweed or smartweed (Polygonum), marshelder (Iva), ragweed (Ambrosia trifida L.), sunflower (Helianthis annua) and others (Benn 1983; Struever and Vickery 1973; Watson 1989).
ARKANSAS was dying of thirst in early December, with most of duck country dusty and covered in dry leaves over hard ground where it should've been knee-deep with mud, smartweed, and buck brush sloughs full of dark water against treelines dropping acorns.
Other prey items of interest, but that were rarely found in the diet, included glass shrimp (Palaemonetes kadiakensis), smartweed (Polygonum spp.) fruits, beggar's ticks (Bidens spp.) fruits, corn (Zea mays) kernels, Asian clams (Corbicula fluminea) and zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha).